CALL FOR PAPERS – Literature: Ecocriticism & Environment

Presentations at the 34th Annual Conference: Southwest/Texas Popular Culture & American Cultural Association Celebrating Popular/American Culture(s) in a Global Context

February 13 – 16, 2013 – Albuquerque, New Mexico
Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center

For detailed information, including information about monetary awards for best graduate school papers in a variety of areas, please go to: http://www.swtxpca.org .

Panels are now being formed for presentations regarding Literature: Ecocriticism and the Environment. Specific areas might include:

  • ecocritical approaches to literature
  • environmentally-focused artists and their art
  • representations of nature and the environment in popular and American culture
  • interdisciplinary approaches to the environment by environmental historians, philosophers, geographers, ecologists, governmental agencies, etc.
  • environmental/ecocritical pedagogy & environmental education
  • environmental discourse in the media
  • the environment in film
  • ecofeminism
  • environmental issues in the Southwest
  • urban environmentalism
  • nature writing and its authors
  • environmental activism, non-profit, governmental issues, etc.

To submit a proposal, go to http://conference2013.swtxpca.org and enter the proposal into the database. Deadline for submissions is November 16, 2012. Accepted applicants will be notified by email, and must register for the conference by December 31, 2012.

Information: Dr. Ken Hada, Chair
Literature: Ecocriticism & Environment
khada@ecok.edu
East Central University
1100 E. 14th St.
Ada, OK 74820
580-559-5557

FINAL CALL FOR PAPERS – Environmental Humanities & the Challenge of Multidisciplinarity

A Workshop at the 13th International Conference of the International Society for the Study of European Ideas, “The Ethical Challenge of Multidisciplinarity: Reconciling ‘The Three Narratives’—Art, Science, and Philosophy”

University of Cyprus, Nicosia, July 2 – 6, 2012

THEME OF THE WORKSHOP
Environmental issues are typically framed within public discourse as problems that require empirical information and technological solutions. This paradigm holds not only scientific but also philosophical  assumptions, most importantly that the real world is the one described  by natural science, the world of scientific realism. In this worldview, all other disciplines (such as ethics, the qualitative social sciences, and politics and policy) are assimilated as “tools in the toolbox” used to solve the problems previously defined by Western science. The intensity of current environmental crises—especially global climate destabilization—energizes this focus on practical problem-solving and on technological and policy solutions within existing institutional, economic, and political frameworks. However, this approach fails to recognize that the humanistic disciplines, including philosophy, literature, and the arts, both construct and express knowledge of nature that exceeds the bounds of problem-solving and the ontology of scientific realism. Further, claims about nature that appeal to the authority of Western science, though masked as objective, are frequently deployed to undergird ideological constructions about race, class, gender, and nation; the authority to make claims about nature is inseparable from political power.

Underlying this default position of the natural sciences is the unexamined assumption that environmental problems are encountered independently of any context, values, history, or disciplinary biases. Humanities scholars in the emerging fields of ecocriticism, environmental art, environmental philosophy, and related areas of inquiry vigorously challenge this assumption, arguing that our environmental problems are inescapably ethical, historical, and political. The very definitions of environmental problems at any given moment are a function of human ideas and negotiations that have a particular cultural location and history and that reflect specific concepts of ethical responsibility and justice. Consequently, the methods of the natural sciences, although necessary for meeting our environmental challenges, cannot replace the interpretive, critical, and artistic methods of the humanities. The emergence of the “environmental humanities,” as a multidisciplinary site of convergence within academic scholarship, responds to this need.

This workshop will engage with the emerging disciplines of the environmental humanities to pose a series of questions, including:

  • How are the methods and epistemology of the humanities distinct from
    those of the empirical sciences?
  • What would a genuinely interdisciplinary approach to questions of the
    environment look like, and how can this be negotiated within current
    institutional limitations?
  • What impact can the humanities have on public discourse and political
    will in specific areas, such as environmental justice and climate change?

PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS
Please submit two-page abstracts by email in Word format to the workshop  organizers by March 15, 2012. Each presenter will have 20 minutes and is  asked to present rather than read a paper. Abstracts of accepted  presentations will be circulated to the participants in advance of the  conference.

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS
Final versions of the papers (not to exceed 3,000 words, or 10  double-spaced pages, including notes) will be reviewed by the workshop  organizers for possible publication in the conference proceedings.

THE CONFERENCE
This workshop is planned under the auspices of the 13th International  Conference of the International Society for the Study of European Ideas,  on the theme “The Ethical Challenge of Multidisciplinarity: Reconciling  ‘The Three Narratives’—Art, Science, and Philosophy.” For more  information, visit ISSEI’s website at http://issei2012.haifa.ac.il/

THE VENUE
The workshop will be held at the University of Cyprus – Main Campus,  Kallipoleos Avenue 75, Nicosia 2100 Cyprus.

WORKSHOP ORGANIZERS
Janet Fiskio
Environmental Studies
Oberlin College
jfiskio@oberlin.edu

Ted Toadvine
Philosophy and Environmental Studies
University of Oregon.
toadvine@uoregon.edu 

DOWNLOAD THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – The Rhetoric of Human-Animal Relations

Workshop at the University of Oslo, May 29-30, 2012

With rhetoric, we make realities. And despite the complaint that humans are “a species which has at last been isolated” (Berger), the realities that humans create with rhetoric are not exclusively human. The purpose of this workshop is to investigate the rhetoric that reaches beyond the human sphere.

In some of its various definitions, rhetoric refers either to “the art of persuasion,” to a continuous process of “identification,” or to an “articulation” that tries to fix meaning in a world where no such meaning is given. In all cases, it appears that rhetoric is something humans perform with and on each other. But if humans are perhaps the only species capable of rhetoric, they are certainly not the only species affected by it. In fact, rhetoric creates the space within which our everyday practices with other beings take place. Rhetoric thus connects the philosophical “question of the animal” with our everyday interactions with animals; in both cases, the salient issue is that – and how – words and other rhetorical means  have consequences.

In this workshop, we will focus on questions like these: How do we use rhetoric to form, understand, explain, discuss, ponder, justify, challenge, and criticize human-animal practices? How do we rhetorically create, uphold, and challenge the norms that are supposed to guide our behavior towards nonhumans? How do visual and verbal rhetorics shape human-animal relations in theory as well as in practice? Finally, how does interacting with animals inspire development of other rhetorics (olfactory, tactile, performative, etc.)?

We invite scholars engaged in rhetorical studies, broadly defined, to present current work on how human-animal spaces of action are created with rhetorical means. We welcome contributions from a variety of academic disciplines and approaches, geographical locations, and fields of practice. The event will take place at the University of Oslo, Norway.

Confirmed keynote speakers:

  • Susan McHugh, University of New England
  • Mara Miele, Cardiff University

Submit an abstract (max. 300 words) of your paper to kristian.bjorkdahl@sum.uio.no by February 1, 2012. Notification of acceptance will be given by February 15, 2012. Deadline for submission of a full paper (10-15 pages) is May 15. Papers will be pre-circulated among the participants. There is an intention to publish papers from the workshop. Please direct any questions to kristian.bjorkdahl@sum.uio.no.

CONFERENCE – Ecological Inequalities and Interventions

Ecological Inequalities & Interventions: Contemporary Environmental Practices

George Mason University, Fairfax Virginia
September 22-23

Flier: Ecological Inequalities and Interventions

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Timothy Luke, Virginia Tech
Author: Capitalism, Democracy, and Ecology: Departing from Marx
Sept. 23rd-4:45 pm

Colloquium Speaker: Dr. Crystal Bartolovich, Syracuse
Discussing: “Commons and The Limits of ‘Biopolitical Production ‘”
Sept. 22nd -4:30pm

Events Schedule:

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011. Location: Mason Hall, D3A & B

2:30-3:00 Registration

3:00-4:15 Professional Panel:

“Making Ecology Work: Professional Environmental Practices”

  • Takis Karontonis
    Director, Columbia Pike Revitalization Organization. Chair, Arlington for a Clean Environment
  • Orjan Lindroth
    Developer, Schooner Bay, Abaco, Bahamas
  • Camilo Arango
    CEM, LEED consultant
  • Dr. Rory Turner
    Academic Director, Program in Cultural Sustainability, Goucher College

4:30-6:00 Cultural Studies Colloquium Lecture Series:

  • Dr. Crystal Bartolovich, Syracuse University
    “Commons and the Limits of ‘Biopolitical Production’”

6:30-8:00 Gallery Opening and Reception: “EcoCultures”

EcoCultures is an exhibition bringing together current cultural productions at the intersections of the arts, sciences and the practice of everyday life to explore the interdependence of our social and biological systems.

Friday, September 23rd. Location: Mason Hall, D3A & B

9:00-9:30 Registration and Reception

9:30-11:00 Panel One: Theorizing Radical Environmental Activism

  • Moderator: Gavin Mueller
  • Todd LeVasseur (University of Florida). “Environmental Activism: Faith is coming to a Struggle near You”
  • Michael Loadenthal (Georgetown University) and Jennifer Grubbs (American University). “Ecoterrorists Unite: Negotiating power through public performance”
  • Scott J. Tulloch (Georgia State University). “The Power of Seeing (or Not Seeing) Where Dinner Comes From: Clandestine Places and the Activist Gaze”
  • Bradley Kaye (Binghamton University). “Ecology as Coextensive with Economy: Deconstructing the Humanist Ethos”

11:10-12:40 Panel Two: Discourse, Representation, Ecology

  • Moderator: John Baker
  • Jennifer Lawrence (Virginia Tech). “The Resource Curse as a Fait Accompli? Casting Reasonable Doubt on Accepted Knowledge and Proposing New Solutions to Old Problems”
  •  Molly Storment (North Carolina State University). “Scapegoating, Mortification, Tools, and Prosthetics in Christopher McCandless’s and Aron Ralston’s Battles in the Wilderness”
  • Stacie Kotschwar (Binghamton University). “Green Beauty and the Intersection of Feminism and Environmentalism”

12:40-1:25 Lunch 

1:25-2:55 Panel Three: Environmental Policy—International Case Studies 

  • Moderator: Lisa Breglia, PhD
  •  Emily Pindilli (George Mason University). “Transforming a fossil-based economy to achieve a sustainable future: incentives for energy efficiency and renewable fuels”
  • Rowan Howard-Williams (University of Pennsylvania). “Global Environment, National Concerns: Environmental Campaigning in Turkey”
  • Xingting Huang (Southeast University, China). “China’s Low-Carbon Oriented Industrial Planning: A Case Study”
  • Sarah Surak (Virginia Tech). “Finding Value in the Trash? Power, Waste Regimes and German Vehicle Recycling Legislation”

 3:05-4:35 Panel Four: Perspectives on Ecological Alienation

  • Moderator: Dan Anderson
  • Matthew Garcia (Arizona State University). “Land Knowledge”
  • Ben Woodward (University of Western Ontario). “Schelling on the Assembly Line: Naturephilosophie, Design, and the Inadequacy of Becoming”
  • Emily Howard (Virginia Tech). “Salvaging the Forest: A Marxian View of Forest Metabolisms”
  • Timothy Griffiths (CUNY: Brooklyn College). “Of Hobos, Farmers, and Geologists: Mixed Environments and Dual Alienation in Breece D’J Pancake’s ‘Trilobites’”

 4:45-5:45 Cultural Studies Colloquium Keynote Speaker:

  • Dr. Timothy Luke, Virginia Tech University

CALL FOR PAPERS – Literature: Ecocriticism & Environment

33rd Annual Conference: Southwest/Texas Popular Culture & American Cultural Association

February 8 – 11, 2012 – Albuquerque, New Mexico
Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center

Proposal submission deadline: December 1, 2011

For details and information please go to: http://www.swtxpca.org

Panels are now being formed for presentations regarding Literature, Ecocriticism and the Environment. Specific areas might include:

  • ecocritical approaches to literature
  • environmentally-focused artists and their art
  • representations of nature and the environment in popular and American culture
  • interdisciplinary approaches to the environment by environmental historians, philosophers, geographers, ecologists, governmental agencies, etc.
  • environmental/ecocritical pedagogy & environmental education
  • environmental discourse in the media
  • the environment in film
  • ecofeminism
  • environmental issues in the Southwest
  • urban environmentalism
  • nature writing and its authors
  • environmental activism, non-profit, governmental issues, etc.

To submit a proposal, go to http://conference2012.swtxpca.org and enter the proposal into the database. Deadline for submissions is December 1, 2011. Accepted applicants will be notified by email, and must register for the conference by December 31, 2011.

Information: Dr. Ken Hada, Chair
Literature: Ecocriticism & Environment

khada@ecok.edu

East Central University

1100 E. 14th St.

Ada, OK 74820
http: www.swtxpca.org

CONFERENCE – Emergent Critical Environments: Where Next for Ecology and the Humanities?

ASLE UK POSTGRADUATE CONFERENCE
9th and 10th September 2011

ASLE UK (Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (UK) www.asle.org.uk) will hold or its Postgraduate Conference from 9 to 10 September 2011 at Queen Mary University’s Mile End campus (London, E1) on the theme of ‘Emergent critical environments: Where next for ecology and the humanities?’

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Kate Soper ‘Neither the “simple backward look” nor the “simple progressive thrust”: Eco-Criticism and the Politics of Prosperity’
Robert McKay ‘Reading the Politics of Species in Cold War Literary Culture: James Agee and Animals’
Tim Clark ‘Derangements of Scale’,
Timothy Morton ‘The Time of Hyperobjects: Hegel, Ecology, Aesthetics’

The conference will focus on the dynamic interrelation between ethics, aesthetics and socio-politics that is central to any critical or artistic configuration of local and global environments.  The overall aim is to facilitate interdisciplinary dialogue between different approaches to the study of environments as both intellectual and physical spaces with animal, mineral, vegetable and academic inhabitants. We are especially interested in emergent critical approaches that are shaping the direction of the response to contemporary and historical ecological issues. This includes areas of thought not conventionally associated with what has come to be known as ecocriticism.

Further information including registration, the conference program, accommodations, and so forth can be found at http://emergentenvironments.wordpress.com/