JOB – Asst. Prof. Environmental Humanities, Duke University

Faculty Position
Environmental Humanities
Duke University

The Department of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University invites applications for a tenure-track appointment in environmental humanities to begin in Fall 2015. The appointment will be made at the Assistant Professor rank; the successful candidate might be jointly appointed in Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment or another Arts & Sciences department. Applications due November 10, 2014. Continue reading

Welcome (?) to the Anthropocene

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
cordially invites you to the 11th Meeting on Environmental Philosophy
Allenspark, Colorado, USA, June 17-20, 2014

Registration deadline: June 10th, 2014

This year’s theme is the the moral significance of the Anthropocene—the ethics of geoengineering, questions about wildness and wilderness, the morality of species extinctions, and related topics. Continue reading

CFC – 11th Meeting on Environmental Philosophy

ISEE Logo #2The International Society for Environmental Ethics is seeking commentators on papers that will be presented at its 11th Annual Meeting that will be held June 17-20, 2014 at the Highlands Presbyterian Retreat Center in Allenspark, Colorado, USA.
Continue reading

CFP – 11th Meeting on Environmental Philosophy

Environmental Philosophy and the Anthropocene Epoch
The ISEE will hold its Eleventh Annual Meeting on Environmental Philosophy, June 17-20, 2014, at the Highlands Retreat Center in Allenspark, Colorado, USA.  Come to the mountains and get their good tidings!

The theme for this year’s conference is “Environmental Philosophy and the Anthropocene Epoch.”   Continue reading

PODCAST SERIES – Generation Anthropocene

Generation Anthropocene, a weekly podcast from Stanford University, provides interviews about the Anthropocene from social, scientific, economic, and moral perspectives.  As environmental philosophers have long talked about moral and philosophical issues surrounding the increasing humanization of the globe, ISEE hopes the folks at Stanford will soon invite an environmental philosopher to weigh in on the issues.

The following podcasts are now available.

Introduction to Series
We highly recommend you have a listen to our compilation piece to get acquainted with our contributors and the wide range of topics covered in the more intimate one-on-one interviews.

 

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Richard White (environmental historian): Richard White addresses the (mis)perceptions of the natural world, the ambiguities surrounding the Anthropocene boundary, and his approach to environmental history.

 

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Terry Root (biologist): Terry Root talks about her approach to bio-diversity loss, earth science communication, and the far-reaching impacts of humankind in our most emotional interview to date.

 

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Jon Payne (paleobiologist/geologist): Jon Payne discusses Earth’s previous mass extinctions including his work on the largest extinction in Earth’s history, how geologists define boundaries, our current understanding of deep time, and how geologists view the Anthropocene debate.

 

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Christopher Gardner (nutritionist): Christopher Gardner discusses the relations of food and society, the modern food movement, and a variety of compelling reasons for rethinking the way we eat in one of our more uplifting conversations.

 

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Bill Durham (human ecologist): Bill Durham discusses his career trajectory including his work in the Galapagos Islands, issues surrounding the new field of eco-tourism, and how a mishap with a lawn mower started his life’s work.

 

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Jon Christensen (environmental historian): Jon Christensen discusses the mythos of the American frontier and some of his unique approaches to history.  Christensen also gazes to the future and makes an interesting case for a placement of the Anthropocene boundary.

 

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Rodolfo Dirzo (tropical evolutionary biologist): Rodolfo Dirzo discusses the importance of biological diversity, his connection to the Anthropocene, and his work in Central and South America in one of our most spirited conversations.

 

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Doug Bird (anthropologist): Doug Bird discusses his work with the native Martu peoples of Australia, their perceptions of environment, the history of landscape modification in the remote and harsh Western dessert, and how the spread of homo sapiens relates to the Anthropocene.

 

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Sally Benson (director GCEP): Sally Benson talks about the goals and recent accomplishments of Stanford’s Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP), the need to partner with industry, the hopeful signs of alternative energy development, and how her upbringing informed her sense of justice and optimism.

 

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Gil Masters (environmental engineer): Gil Masters highlights the importance of buildings in shaping our energy demands and explores the potential of energy efficiency while offering fresh and practical solutions to the energy and climate crisis.

 

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Patrick Archie (agricultural ecologist): Patrick Archie reflects on the social justice of food, the evolution of his profession, and his vision for community development as it relates to food systems.

 

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Leonard Ortolano (environmental engineer): Leonard Ortolano reflects on his professional trajectory and how environmentalism has guided water resource planning, gives us a brief history of US environmental assessment work, and explores the complexity of water as it relates to climate change.

INSTITUTE, JOURNAL, BOOK – Breakthrough!

Created by Michael Shellenberger and Ted Nordhaus who gained wide exposure with their widely discussed article The Death of Environmentalism, the Breakthrough Institute (est. 2003) aims to modernize liberal-progressive-green politics by focusing on overarching conceptual paradigms and not just specific environmental policies.  The Institute has started a journal, Breakthrough Journal, which released its first and second issues last year.  The second issue includes pieces by Peter Kareiva, Mark Sagoff, and Vaclav Smil.  Finally, Shellenberger and Ted Nordhaus have edited Love Your Monsters, an anthology about postenvironmentalism and the anthropocene.