CFP: 2021 ISEE group sessions at APA Central

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Call for Papers

THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL

ETHICS

2021 Central Meeting of the American Philosophical Association

 

Submissions are invited for the International Society for Environmental Ethics Group Sessions at the 2020 Central Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association at the   Astor Crowne Plaza, in New Orleans, LA Wednesday, February 24 – Saturday, 27, 2021.  

 

 

Research in any area of philosophy related to or concerning environmental issues is welcomed.

 

ISEE is committed to diversity, equity, and inclusion, and we welcome submissions from all, including scholars of color, LGTBQ scholars, indigenous scholars, and other scholars from communities underrepresented in the profession.

 

We invite submissions for individual papers (presentations of approximately 20 minutes) as well as themed sessions (topical discussions, panels, author-meets-critics, etc…)

 

Submission Procedure:

       Please submit materials by the end of the day on September 10th, 2020.

      For individual papers: please provide a 300-word abstract.

      For themed sessions: please submit 1) the proposed session title, 2) a brief description (approximately 500 words) of the session including the names of all participants, and 3) titles for all papers. Individual paper abstracts are strongly encouraged, and all participants should be confirmed as willing to attend if the session goes forward.

      Materials should be submitted in Microsoft Word or PDF format to: Megs Gendreau (ISEE Treasurer) at megs.gendreau@centre.edu

      Please include “ISEE/APA” in the subject line of your email and feel free to contact Megs if you have further questions or concerns.

CFP:ISEE sessions at the 2021 APA Pacific Meeting

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Call for Papers

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS

2021 Pacific Meeting of the American Philosophical Association

 Submissions are invited for the International Society for Environmental Ethics group sessions at the 2021 Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association (APA). The meeting will be held March 31 – April 3, 2021, at the Hilton Portland Downtown in Portland, Oregon.

The ISEE invites submissions of individual papers (approximately 20 minute presentations) or proposals for themed sessions (particular topics, author-meets-critics, etc.).

Please include any interest in chairing a session as well.

People working in any area of ethics concerning environmental issues are encouraged to submit proposals.

Submission Procedure:

  • For individual paper submissions, please submit either: (1) a 300-word abstract, or (2) a full paper (approx. 3000 words).
  • For themed sessions, please submit the proposed session title, a brief description of the session, names of all those participating, and titles for each paper. Paper abstracts (of up to 300 words) are strongly encouraged. Participants should be confirmed as willing to attend if the session goes forward.
  • Materials should be submitted in Microsoft Word or PDF format to: Alex Lee (ISEE Secretary) at aplee@alaskapacific.edu 
Please include “ISEE/APA” in the subject line.
  • The deadline for submitting proposals is September 30, 2020.

AWARD ANNOUNCEMENT:Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics

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AWARD ANNOUNCEMENT:

Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics

Chris Cuomo Keynote Presentation at 17th Annual ISEE Meeting

To help build a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive field of environmental ethics, the International Society for Environmental Ethics seeks to highlight intersectional scholarship in environmental philosophy. This includes, but is not limited to, work that examines linkages between environmental philosophy, feminist and gender studies, critical race theory, Indigenous studies, and disability studies. ISEE aims to support research, teaching, and service that extend the scope of environmental ethics to incorporate perspectives and methods that have been historically marginalized or excluded from environmental philosophy as a discipline, and that address questions of epistemic justice, such as the devaluation of certain forms of knowledge within academic environmental philosophy, barriers to and opportunities for developing more inclusive perspectives, and approaches to respectfully collaborating across perspectives and traditions. We seek to honor and advance work that brings different threads of philosophy and environmental thought together.

In support of these aims, we establish the Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics.

Victoria Davion was raised in New York City, earned her Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1989 and joined the department of Philosophy at the University of Georgia in 1990. She became the first woman to become a full professor in Philosophy at UGA, and the first woman to be appointed department head in 2005, a position she held until her death in 2017. She became widely known for her cutting-edge interdisciplinary work in feminist and environmental ethics, where she made truly transformative contributions, and was a beloved teacher and mentor to many who were inspired by her engaging, accessible, and innovative teaching methods. She presented and published on a breadth of philosophical areas including political philosophy, power and privilege, healthcare, nuclear deterrence, artificial intelligence, abortion, whiteness, and technology. She co-edited The Idea of a Political Liberalism: Essays on Rawls (2000) and was an associate editor of the Encyclopedia of Environmental Ethics (2009). A lover of nonhuman animals, music, and travel, as well as a witty, engaging, generous, and astute person, Vicky also made a far-reaching impact as the founder and editor of the journal, Ethics & the Environment , which she first published in 1995 and which continues as a highly influential journal today.

In helping to catalyze and bring forth intersectional understanding within environmental philosophy, her contribution inspires this Award and all those whose accomplishments it recognizes.

ISEE is pleased to announce that Prof. Chris Cuomo is the recipient of the inaugural Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics. Dr. Cuomo is Professor of Philosophy and Women’s at the University of Georgia, where she is an affiliated faculty with the Institute for African American Studies, the Institute for Native American Studies, the Environmental Ethics Certificate Program, and the Initiative on Climate and Society. Cuomo has made substantial contributions in the areas and intersections of feminist theory, environmental philosophy, philosophy of science, philosophy of race, climate justice, postcolonial thought, Indigenous knowledge, and activism.

In addition to many journal articles and book chapters, Cuomo is the author of Feminism and Ecological Communities: An Ethic of Flourishing (Routledge 1998) and The Philosopher Queen: Feminist Essays on War, Love, and Knowledge (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers 2002), co-author of the Feminist Philosophy Reader (McGraw Hill 2007), and co-editor of Whiteness: Feminist Philosophical Reflections (Rowman & Littlefield 1999).

On October 16, 2020 Prof. Chris Cuomo will deliver the keynote presentation at the 17th Annual ISEE Conference and will be awarded with the 2020 Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics.

Call for Nominations: 2020 ISEE Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy

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Call for Nominations for the

2020 ISEE Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy

 The International Society for Environmental Ethics established an award to promote work in public philosophy and honor contributions to the field by Dr. Andrew Light, who received the inaugural award in his name at our 2017 annual summer meeting.

With this call, the Society seeks nominations for the Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy. We strive to recognize public philosophers working in environmental ethics and philosophy, broadly construed, those who are working to bring unique insights or methods to broaden the reach, interaction, and engagement of public philosophy with the wider public.  This may be exemplified in published work or engagement in environmental issues of public importance.

The award is offered without prejudice to stage of career and may be demonstrated by singular work, or engagement of importance, or over a career.  It is important to note that early career scholars are viable candidates and their nominations strongly encouraged. Self-nominations are welcome.

Nominations should include:

(a) A letter of nomination, listing the name, affiliation (if any), and contact information of both the nominee and nominator. The letter should explain how and why the nominee qualifies for the award;

(b) The nominee’s curriculum vitae or professional resume.

Nominations may also include:

(c) Descriptions and representative samples of work in public philosophy, such as op-eds, public presentations, descriptions of philosophically driven civic interactions, or alternative media engagements (blogs, videos, podcasts, etc.) or work about the public importance of environmental philosophy in professional journals;

(d) Additional letters of endorsement for the nomination, no more than two.

 

Nominations assembling these materials into one Adobe Acrobat PDF file are strongly preferred.

Nominations previously submitted for the 2019 Award may be reactivated. Please contact us, as below.

Nominations are due by October 1, 2020. They will be evaluated by ISEE Officers and members of the ISEE Nominating Committee.

 

Send nominations to ISEE President Allen Thompson via email:  allen.thompson@oregonstate.edu

Announcement of the winner and finalists will be made at the ISEE group session meeting during the Eastern Division American Philosophical Assoc., Jan. 4-7, 2021. The award includes a financial prize.

2020 Call for Papers: Holmes Rolston III Early Career Essay Prize in Environmental Philosophy

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To mark the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day, the ISEE and the Center for Environmental Philosophy are re-issuing an essay prize for scholars in the early stages of their career.

The prize is named in honor of Professor Holmes Rolston III, for his pioneering work in the field of environmental philosophy. Papers are invited on all aspects of environmental philosophy or environmental affairs (with a strong theoretical component).

A prize of $500 will be awarded to the winning essay. All submitted papers that qualify (see conditions) will be reviewed by an Essay Prize Committee in consultation with the Editorial Board of Environmental Ethics. The winning essay will be published in the journal Environmental Ethics.

Scholars who have earned their doctorate no more than five years prior to submission are invited to submit an essay. Submissions must be accompanied by a one-page CV to provide evidence of early career status.

The closing date for submissions is August 1st, 2020.

The word limit is 60,000 characters (including spaces), including notes and references. An abstract of 100-150 words should also be included. For style, consult the Chicago Manual of Style or any recent issue of Environmental Ethics. Essays must be prepared for blind review (cover page with contact information and email on a separate page). Submissions should be emailed to ISEE President Allen Thompson at: <allen.thompson@oregonstate.edu>. Please put ‘Essay Prize’ in the subject line of the email submission. The essay should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere, and should not be submitted to any other journal until the outcome of the competition is announced. The decision of the committee will be final. There is only one prize per year, and the committee reserves the right not to award the prize if submissions are not of an appropriate standard.

 

Call for Proposals to Host the Eighteenth Annual Summer Meeting of the International Society for Environmental Ethics

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The International Society for Environmental Ethics (ISEE) is seeking proposals to host its Eighteenth Annual Meeting on Environmental Philosophy in summer of 2021.

For many years, annual summer meetings of the ISEE convened in Allenspark, CO, while most recently we have met at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Blue River, OR. Others have made successful proposals to host the ISEE conference internationally (including Nijmegen, the Netherlands, East Anglia, England, and Kiel, Germany) and nationally (New York, NY).

We welcome all proposals.

Information about the Society, including past conferences, can be found on our webpage: enviroethics.org

 Deadline for proposals: July 1, 2020

 

Submission Guidelines
Proposals should include the following information, complied in a single PDF:

  • Host name and proposed dates of the meeting
  • Information about the location and venue
  • Information about accommodations, meals, and transportation, etc.
  • A short “case for support” for the proposal, including ideas for themes/sessions/keynote speaker, and so forth. The case for support should also provide evidence of institutional support, if possible.

Questions and submissions (as a single PDF) should be sent to ISEE President, Allen Thompson at <allen.thompson@oregonstate.edu>

2020 Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy

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The International Society for Environmental Ethics (ISEE) is pleased to announce publicly the winner and finalists for the Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy.  ISEE established the award to promote work in public philosophy and honor contributions to the field by Dr. Andrew Light, who was recognized for his distinctive work in public environmental philosophy at ISEE’s 2017 annual summer meeting.

With this award, ISEE strives to recognize public philosophers working in environmental ethics and philosophy, broadly construed, and who bring unique insights or methods that broaden the reach, interaction, and engagement of philosophy with the wider public.  This may be exemplified in published work or engagement in environmental issues of public importance.

This year’s honorees have made important contributions and provide distinctive examples of the work in public environmental philosophy that is happening today.

This year’s winner is Professor Paul Thompson of Michigan State University.  Professor Thompson’s work in public philosophy spans multiple decades, and he has made distinctive contributions to agricultural and environmental ethics over the course of his career.  He began working collaboratively with farmers in the 1980s to develop industry reforms that benefited both animals and the environment.  Throughout his career, Professor Thompson’s research has informed and been informed by cross-disciplinary collaborations and community engagement.  He is the author of numerous books, including books aimed for broad audiences, such as From Field to Fork: Food Ethics for Everyone (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015).  Professor Thompson has served on National Resource Council committees and with the National Academy of Engineering’s Center for Engineering Ethics and Society, and he’s played a key role in developing ethical food standards such as American Humane Certified.  In addition, he has helped to build the field of public philosophy and has mentored others developing careers in this field.  As two of his colleagues wrote in their nomination letter, “Many environmental philosophers have come to value public engagement by observing how Paul Thompson incorporated insights from his public work into his more traditionally philosophical articles and books, and we have come to better understand how to become publicly engaged ourselves through his mentoring. Paul, we believe, is an exemplary public environmental philosopher who has made significant contributions at various levels and with various groups, from policymakers, researchers and academic colleagues, to farmers, consumers and environmentalists.”

This year’s finalists are Associate Professor Adam Briggle of University of North Texas, Professor Christopher Preston of University of Montana, and Dr. Gwynne Taraska, Climate Program Director at Ocean Conservancy in Washington, D.C.

Adam Briggle, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion at University of North Texas, describes himself as a “field philosopher.”  In his book, A Field Philosopher’s Guide to Fracking, he argues that “the role of a field philosopher is to excavate and examine the ethical, aesthetic, and even metaphysical presumptions that are inevitably packed into the black box of expert discourse and political messaging.”  Briggle has centered his career around publicly engaged philosophy.  In addition to his academic writing, he has published work in Slate, Salon, and The New York Times, and he is highly active in his community.  His work as founder and President of the Denton Drilling Advisory Group led to a successful campaign to ban hydraulic fracturing in Denton, Texas.  Professor Briggle also serves on the Governing Board for the Public Philosophy Network, and is a member of the Human Rights Campaign’s Parents for Transgender Equality Council.

Christopher Preston, Professor of Philosophy at University of Montana made a distinctive contribution to public philosophy with his recently published a book, The Synthetic Age: Outdesigning Evolution, Resurrecting Species, and Reengineering Our World (MIT Press, 2018). The book, which won a 2019 Nautilus award, aims to spark discussion about the technologies that are reshaping human relations with the broader world.  Preston also runs a related blog – The Plastocene – that aims to generate broader public dialogue about “the big decisions about how to approach a world that has already been impacted so greatly,” because “[d]ecisions about the world we want to create belong to everyone.”  Professor Preston’s public philosophical work has included writing for the BBC, Aeon, The Conversation, and the Center for Humans and Nature, and he has been featured in interviews for numerous news sources, including the BBC, LA Times, and The Guardian.

Gwynne Taraska earned her PhD in philosophy at University of Washington, and shortly thereafter, began to apply her philosophical acumen in the policy arena.  She is currently Climate Program Director at Ocean Conservancy in Washington, D.C.  Dr. Taraska previously served as Director of Policy and Research at Climate Advisers, and as Director of International Climate Policy at the Center for American Progress.  She has worked on a wide range of issues, including climate diplomacy, international climate finance, international ocean diplomacy, the Paris Agreement, and climate loss and damage.  Her work and expertise have been featured in the New York Times, Washington Post, Newsweek, The Hill, Vox, and Energy & Environment.  As one colleague noted: “Gwynne clearly represents the kind of pioneer that we need in public philosophy: someone who has used core philosophical skills to break new ground in the policy community.”

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Environmental Studies: Assistant Professor of Environmental Policy

The Environmental Studies Department at the University of Portland invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor of Environmental Policy with a start date of August 2021. The Environmental Studies Department offers a B.A. in Environmental Ethics and Policy and a B.S. in Environmental Science. A Ph.D. in Environmental Policy or Public Policy with an environmental focus, or in any other field with evidence of expertise in environmental policy is required. A commitment to undergraduate teaching is essential, ideally supported by past evidence of effective teaching at any level.

The ENV department is committed to diversifying our curriculum and our faculty. The successful candidate will have demonstrated lived experience, knowledge, skills, and/or success in diversity, equity and inclusion work within or transferable to higher education; these should be described in the cover letter, teaching statement, and/or a separate diversity statement. We are particularly interested in candidates who have experience engaging with underrepresented students.

The successful candidate for the Environmental Policy position will offer stability to the B.A. program and teach courses in general environmental policy as well as more focused courses in their area of specialization.  The department is especially interested in candidates grounded in an environmental justice perspective and specializing in urban issues; applications are also welcome from those grounded in environmental justice with other areas of interest relevant to a broadly-based department/curriculum. In addition to teaching multiple courses in environmental policy, the successful candidate will develop and teach a course in environmental justice and contribute to the senior capstone. The person who fills this position will also be expected to supervise internships and connect to/partner with local community groups and NGO’s to enhance opportunities for students.

Founded in 1901, the University of Portland is a private, comprehensive, Catholic university with a mission (www.up.edu/about/mission) of teaching and learning, faith and formation, service and leadership. In the ENV department, we see our work developing the whole person and preparing people who respond to the needs of the world and its human family as aligning with the University’s mission.  Candidates will articulate their understanding of the university mission in their cover letter and highlight how it is compatible with their approach to teaching, scholarship, and service. The typical teaching load is 3-3, with a single course release in the first year.

A complete application will include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, official graduate transcripts, a statement of teaching philosophy, which includes candidate interest and/or experience in diversity and inclusion, and the names of three references we can contact. All supporting materials should be submitted to https://up.hiretouch.com/job-details?jobid=64577 by Oct. 15, 2020. Please contact Blair Woodard (woodard@up.edu), co-chair of the Environmental Policy Search Committee, with any questions.

A background investigation check is required before final hiring procedures can be completed for all faculty and staff positions.

For those requiring a reasonable accommodation to apply: Applicants who have a disability and would like to request a reasonable accommodation regarding the application or hiring process should contact Human Resources (503) 943-8484.

The University of Portland is an Equal Opportunity employer fully dedicated to achieving a diverse faculty and staff. The University of Portland does not discriminate in its educational programs, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic and other school-administered programs, or employment on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, disability, age, sexual orientation, or any other basis protected by and consistent with the law. Please see the University’s full Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination Policy here: https://www1.up.edu/disclosures/nondiscrimination-policy.html.

CFP: ISEE sessions at the 2021 Eastern APA

Call for Papers International Society for Environmental Ethics

 2021 Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association

Submissions are invited for the International Society for Environmental Ethics (ISEE) group sessions at the 2021 Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association (APA). The meeting is scheduled for January 4-7, 2021 in at the Sheraton New York Times Square in New York City.

ISEE invites submissions of individual papers (approximately 20 minutes presentation) or proposals for themed sessions (particular topics, author-meets-critics, etc.). People working in any area of ethics related to the environment or environmental issues are encouraged to submit proposals.  However, we are particularly interested in work that extends the scope of environmental ethics to incorporate perspectives and methods that have been historically marginalized or excluded from environmental philosophy as a discipline, or that engage issues of contemporary relevance.  You do not need to be a member of ISEE in order to submit a proposal; however, we ask that all presenters have a current membership in the society.

Please note the following information from the APA: Currently, all three APA divisions are planning to hold in-person meetings in 2021. At the same time, we are also considering alternative formats, such as virtual meetings, as contingencies in the case that our usual meeting format becomes impossible.

Submission Procedure:

For individual paper submissions, please submit either: (1) a 500-word abstract, or (2) a full paper (approx. 3000 words).

For themed sessions, please submit the proposed session title, a brief description of the session, names of all those participating, and titles for each paper/presentation. Paper abstracts (of approx. 500 words) are strongly encouraged. Participants should be confirmed as willing to attend if the session goes forward.

Materials should be submitted in Microsoft Word or PDF format to: Marion Hourdequin (ISEE Vice-President) at mhourdequin@coloradocollege.edu.  Please include “ISEE/APA” in the subject line.  The deadline for submitting proposals is Wednesday, July 15, 2020. 

Statement on Systemic Racism and Violence

June 8, 2020

The International Society for Environmental Ethics recognizes and condemns systemic racism. We are outraged by the ongoing pattern of racialized police violence in the United States, and we are saddened and angered by the killings of George Floyd, Tony McDade, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and many others. Such cases are only the latest in a long history of unjust violence and dehumanization based on race. We support and encourage protests that demand justice in response to these killings and seek to dismantle systemic racism. We stand with those who fight for justice and so condemn the violent and egregious use of force against protestors who are exercising both political rights as citizens and moral rights as persons.

We recognize Black Lives Matter as a human rights campaign aimed at dismantling the pervasive social norms that support and protect systems of white supremacy. The injustices that such systems generate in the United States are evidenced, for example, by the disproportionate impacts of the novel coronavirus on Black and Brown communities, as well as environmental injustices that include racial disparities in access to healthy foods, safe working conditions, clean air and water, climate adaptation resources, and parks and open spaces.

As officers of the Society, we recognize our privilege and our responsibility to listen to and and be led by voices from marginalized and under-represented members of our community. We actively seek to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in our academic discipline and in our professional organization, but we recognize that we must do more to advance the work and career opportunities of Black scholars, as well as scholars from all under-represented groups, and to further support scholarship that addresses the intersections between environmental justice and institutionalized systems of racism and oppression. We must also encourage our members of privilege to make their own work more inclusive and to be actively anti-racist.

In sum, we commit the International Society for Environmental Ethics to much work that still needs to be done in the active pursuit of ending white supremacy, police brutality, and widespread racial and environmental injustices.

In solidarity,

Allen Thompson, President 

Marion Hourdequin, Vice President 

Megs Gendreau, Treasurer

Alex Lee, Secretary