CFP: International Society for Environmental Ethics 17th Annual Summer Meeting

Featured

Call for papers on themes concerning

Action and the Climate Crisis

July 6-9, 2020
H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Blue River, Oregon

This call for papers solicits 500-word proposals for presentations on any topic in environmental philosophy. However, special attention will be given to proposals for talks concerning issues connected with first-order normative claims, initiatives, and action in response to the range of environmental threats connected to climate change, biodiversity loss, mass extinction, pollution, and ecosystem degradation.

An escalating rhetoric of a “crisis” or “emergency” has accompanied an increase of public awareness about harmful climate impacts and degraded environmental conditions. With some regularity, we hear that observed phenomena either meet or exceed the worst-case scenarios within a suite of possible trajectories. Predicted changes in the natural world are unfolding more rapidly than expected, e.g. loss of Arctic ice, and international pledges to act are simply not being met, as global GHG emissions continue to grow. Empirical studies reveal surprising and deeply troubling information about, for example, the collapse of insect and bird populations, while some powerful right-wing and authoritarian political leaders only exacerbate the problems, e.g. Trump’s withdraw from the Paris Agreement and Bolsonaro’s policies of deforestation and development in the Amazon.

In response, there has been growing youth-led, political engagement, exemplified by the international school strikes for climate action and the U.S. Sunrise Movement, as well as a return to non-violent direct action (e.g., by Extinction Rebellion in the UK). One widespread refrain asserts we have only 12 years to radically transform society, which calls for a mobilization equivalent to those made to fight world wars. How should we think about that? While environmental philosophy has traditionally focused on theory, concepts, and ideological frameworks (e.g. conceptions of intrinsic value, anthropocentrism, and environmental justice), the theme of this conference is to focus on praxis, conduct, behavior, and concrete action: How can philosophy help us understand and engage with conditions that call us to action? How can we do activism well in the climate arena, both strategically and ethically? What will future generations, in retrospect, think we should be doing today?

Proposals prepared for blind review should be submitted via email to Allen Thompson, <allen.thompson@oregonstate.edu> no later than March 1st, 2020. Decisions will be announced by April 15th.

ISEE Sessions at APA Central

Featured

ISEE will be hosting 2 affiliated group sessions at the 2020 Central Division Meeting of the APA:

Friday, February 28  7:00pm – 10:00pm

Climate Justice

Chair:

Ben Almassi

Speakers:

William Littlefield (Case Western Reserve University) – “Utility Gains in Climate Justice”

Marcus Hedahl (US Naval Academy) – “Climate Justice & Moral Psychology: Surprising Stoic Solutions”

Kizito Michael George (Kyambogo University) – “Linking Climate Change to Human Rights and Social Justice: A Critique of the Ethics and Epistemologies of Climate Change Science”

Rachel Fredericks (Ball State University) – “Climate Legacy: A New(ish) Concept for the Climate Crisis”

Saturday, February 29  2:00pm – 5:00pm

Understanding Community

Chair: Megs Gendreau (Centre College)

Speakers:

Connor Kianpour (Georgia State University) – “Dolphin Ownerhood: Nonhuman Persons and Habitative Noninterference”

Sade Hormio (UC Berkeley) – “Climate Change and Responsibility as Members of Collective Agents”

Justin Donhauser (Bowling Green State University) – “Robot Pollinator Ethics”

Zachary Vereb (University of South Florida) – “A Kantian Perspective on Climate Ethics: History and Global Community” 

ISEE Sessions at APA Pacific

Featured

The 2020 Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association will be April 8th to 11th at the Westin St. Francis in San Francisco, CA. 

ISEE will be hosting two affiliated group sessions.

Session 1: Wednesday April 8th from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Teaching Environmental Philosophy: Engaged and Inclusive Pedagogies

Chairs: Simona Capisani (University of California, Irvine)
Marion Hourdenquin (Colorado College)
Panelists: Chris Cuomo (University of Georgia)
Rebeka Ferreira (Green River College)
Benjamin Hole (Pacific University)
Clair Morrissey (Occidental College)

Session 2: Saturday April 11th from 6:00 to 8:00

Environmental Ethics: Ethics for a Changing World

Speakers:

Arthur Obst (University of Washington) – “Demandingness from Despair”

Daniel Callies (University of California, San Diego) and Yasha Rohwer (Oregon Institute of Technology) – “Intentionally Eradicating a Species: Examining the Case against and the Value of Anopheles Gambiae”

Blake Francis (University of Maryland Baltimore County) – “Middle Emissions: Climate Ethics and the Global Middle Class”

ISEE Sessions at APA Eastern

Featured

Workshop on Sustainability in Philosophy

Friday, January 10, 2020, 9-11 am

This session will open with a special announcement of this year’s finalists and winner of ISEE’s Andrew Light Award in Public Philosophy.  Professor Light will present the award.  

Following the award presentation, the workshop will be led by co-founders of Philosophers for Sustainability (PfS), Eugene Chislenko of Temple University and Rebecca Millsop of University of Rhode Island.  Professors Millsop and Chislenko will describe several recent initiatives of Philosophers for Sustainability and lead a discussion of effective ways to integrate sustainability into teaching, research, and service. The workshop will include discussion of a proposed set of Guidelines for Sustainable Practices in Philosophy, developed by PfS and under consideration by the APA for inclusion in its Good Practices Guide.

Environmental Ethics in Social Context:

Robots, Gene Drives, and Water Management

Saturday, January 11, 2020, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

 

Chair: Marion Hourdequin

Speakers:

Justin Donhauser (Bowling Green University) “Environmental Robot Virtues?”

Zahra Meghani (University of Rhode Island), “An Approach for Evaluating Arguments for the Environmental Release of Genetically Engineered Animals with Gene Drives”

Gehad Abdelal (University of Georgia) “Water Ethics: The Problem of Uncertainty and Colonial Implication on the Nile River Conflict”

Postdoctoral Fellow, NYU Shanghai and the Center for Environmental and Animal Protection

Description

NYU Shanghai and the Center for Environmental and Animal Protection (CEAP) at NYU New York invite applications for a Postdoctoral Fellow to work on “Bending the Curve: Meat and Dairy Production and Consumption in China.”  The Postdoctoral Fellow will be jointly supervised by Professor Yifei Li (NYU Shanghai) and Dale Jamieson (CEAP). Postdoctoral Fellow will be based in Shanghai and be part of the NYU Shanghai academic community. We offer a generous compensation package, funds to support research and travel, and aim to offer access to NYU faculty housing.

Bending the Curve is a three-year project focused on understanding present and future trends in animal protein consumption in the PRC and on producing recommendations for actions and policies that would reduce consumption from the “business as usual” projections. The work will involve inventorying and understanding present consumption and trend lines, understanding and inventorying present incentives and disincentives for production and consumption, and providing recommendations and engagement with key stakeholders.  

The responsibilities of the successful applicant will be quite diverse including conducting research, planning workshops, and managing data. The Postdoctoral Fellow will be centrally involved in publishing project results in refereed journals and in preparing occasional briefings for a broader audience.

NYU Shanghai is the third degree-granting campus within New York University’s global network. It is the first higher education joint venture in China authorized to grant degrees that are accredited in the U.S. as well as in China. All teaching is conducted in English. A research university with liberal arts and science at its core, it resides in one of the world’s great cities with a vibrant intellectual community. NYU Shanghai recruits scholars of the highest caliber who are committed to NYU’s global vision of transformative teaching and innovative research and who embody the global society in which we live.

Qualifications

Qualifications include a Ph.D. or equivalent degree in a relevant field, fluency in both English and Chinese, ability to work with both English and Chinese data, and familiarity with multiple methods of social science research.  

Application Instructions

Interested applicants should submit a CV, contact information for three academic referees, and a cover letter addressing research, academic interests, and interest in this project.

Application review will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.  The appointment can begin on May 1st, 2020 and preferably no later than July 1st 2020.  Please visit our website at http://shanghai.nyu.edu/en/about/work-here/open-positions-faculty for instructions and other information on how to apply. If you have any questions, please e-mail shanghai.faculty.recruitment@nyu.edu.

ERNEST PARTRIDGE:   May 14, 1935 — June 30, 2018:

Auto Obituary

I have enjoyed eighty-three wonderful years of love, adventure, good health, service and accomplishment. I have lived through the golden age of the United States and have been spared the anguish of witnessing its decline. And so I have no cause for complaint. I depart with gratitude to my wife Elinore for her enduring love and support and to countless others who have enriched my life. I have accepted the inevitable ending of my life without fear but with some regret, primarily regret that many of my projects in progress will remain uncompleted.

 

I do wish to thank the outstanding medical staff at Kaiser for extending my life painlessly, allowing me more time to prepare for my death without anxiety and with tranquility. I have been able to put this time to good use.

 

Formal Obituary

Ernest DeAlton Partridge, Jr.,, Ph.D, environmental philosopher, died on June 30. 2018 of pancreatic cancer. Born in New York City on May 14, 1935, Partridge attended the College High School of Montclair State College (Now Montclair University) in New Jersey. Married to Elinore Hughes, December 20, 1957. His three degrees are from the University of Utah. His doctoral dissertation, “Rawls and the Duty to Posterity,” (1976), was the first among the thousands listed in Dissertation Abstracts to deal with the topics “Future Generations” or “Posterity.” “Duty to Posterity” was to become Dr. Partridge’s primary focus of interest throughout his career, along with environmental ethics, and moral and political philosophy. He began his teaching career at Paterson State College in New Jersey, and Hunter College in New York City. He served on the Faculties of California State University, Fullerton, and the University of California, Santa Barbara and Riverside. He retired from teaching in 1997 as the Hulings Professor of Environmental Ethics, at Northland College in Wisconsin. Partridge is the author of more than eighty invited and peer-reviewed scholarly publications, and of dozens of unpublished conference papers. His anthology, “Responsibilities to Future Generations” was published in 1981. Throughout most of his career, Dr. Partridge served on the Board of Editors of Environmental Ethics and the Journal of Environmental Education. He was the recipient of research grants from the University of Utah, the Rockefeller Foundation, and twice from the National Science Foundation. In November, 1989, Dr. Partridge was invited to present a paper at a conference on “The Ethics of Non-Violence” at the Soviet Academy of Sciences in Moscow. Six additional professional visits to Russia followed during the Nineties. In addition, during that eventful decade, Dr. Partridge presented papers at conferences in Canada, Japan, Italy, Germany, and at Oxford University in England. In 1998, a year after his retirement from teaching, Dr. Partridge established the website, The Online Gadfly ( gadfly.igc.org) for which he wrote more than 260 original essays, most of which were reposted on numerous progressive websites. An accomplished classical guitarist, Partridge performed in concert and on Public Television in Utah, and at restaurants, clubs and resorts in Utah, Colorado and California. He is survived by his wife, Dr. Elinore Hughes Partridge, and a brother, Robert Truman Partridge, sister-in-law, Elaine Partridge, as well as devoted, and beloved, nieces and nephews.