CFP: Settler Colonialism and Environmental Ethics

Special Issue of Environmental Ethics

Settler colonialism intersects with environmental issues, e.g. land use, water management, traditional ecological knowledge, ethics of place, environmental justice…  This connection is, however, sorely under-discussed in environmental philosophy. This special issue intends to breach this divide.

Papers can treat any topic in settler colonialism that connects with environmental philosophy broadly construed.

Proposals are invited in English but translation options for parallel publication in other languages can be discussed

Proposals from voices in academically under-represented groups are especially invited

Non-academically-traditional approaches are also welcomed

Deadline: 5pm, March 2 2020 Central Time (CT, i.e. Dallas, TX) A detailed abstract (~500-700 words) should be submitted

to Jeff Gessas at William.Gessas@unt.edu

Authors will be notified by March 31, 2020  Full submission:  June 30, 2020

Queries can be directed to Jeff Gessas at:

William.Gessas@unt.edu

the University of Twente: Assistant Professor in ethics or political philosophy

The department of philosophy at the University of Twente is looking for an

Assistant Professor in ethics or political philosophy

focusing on emerging technology and its role in society (e.g., biomedical, environmental, digital)

Two-year appointment with prospects for a permanent position The Challenge

For the research part of your appointment, you will develop your own research line. This will initially be developed within Ethics of Socially Disruptive Technologies, a new ten- year long international research programme of seven academic institutions in the Netherlands that will run from January 2020 to December 2029. This programme has the aim of achieving breakthrough research in at the intersection of ethics, philosophy, technology / engineering and social sciences, and to position its consortium at the top of its field internationally. It has a combined budget of € 27 million ! It includes four research lines, “Nature, life and human intervention”, “The future of a free and fair society”, “The human condition” and “Synthesis: Ethics of Technology, Practical Philosophy, and Modern Technology Driven Societies”. Please note that we will be advertising other positions in this programme and that you can apply for several at once.

Your research will further be embedded in the research programme of the University of Twente as well as in the four-university 4TU.Center for Ethics and Technology (www.ethicsandtechnology.eu). We expect candidates to apply for external funding and to engage in international and interdisciplinary collaboration.

You teach courses within your specialization area in the master programme in Philosophy of Science, Technology and Society (PSTS). You also teach introductory courses in different areas of philosophy, for bachelor and master programs in engineering and social science. You will be involved in the supervision of master’s theses in the PSTS programme and will supervise PhD students.

The division of tasks is 40% research – 50% teaching – 10% management and administration. Research time can be increased through grant acquisition !

Our offer

You will be appointed for two years with a prospect for a permanent position upon good performance. The university offers a dynamic ecosystem with enthusiastic colleagues in which internationalization is an important part of the strategic agenda.

• Starting salary between € 3.637 to € 5.656 gross per month based on your experience;

  • An additional holiday allowance of 8% of the gross annual salary and a year-end bonus of 8.3%;
  • A solid pension scheme;
  • Possibilities to save up holidays for sabbatical leave;
  • Minimum of 29 holidays in case of full-time employment;
  • Professional and personal development programs;
  • A high degree of responsibility and independence, while collaborating with close colleagues, researchers and other university staff is strongly encouraged.

    Candidates we seek

  • show vision and entrepreneurial drive (seeing opportunities and possibilities, showing ambition);
  • hold a Ph.D. in philosophy, preferably with a specialization in ethics or political philosophy. We also welcome dual areas of specialization, e.g., ethics and another area, such as philosophical anthropology, epistemology, or philosophy of language;
  • have experience in research, which is apparent from publications in highly ranked academic journals, presentations at international scientific conferences, and other academic activities;
  • possess good communication skills and an excellent command of English, at least at C2 level;
  • have teaching experience (both lecturing and tutoring) at an internationally accredited university preferably including students in science & engineering, social science, or other nonphilosophical fields, and preferably including professional and/or applied ethics
  • possess a University Teaching Qualification (UTQ) certificate, or be willing to obtain this, and have a real passion for, and the ambition to become a creative and effective teacher;
  • are active in, or are willing to build up, networks for obtaining research funding, and have ambition to work closely with companies and government agencies.

    Information and application

    For more information, please contact Prof. dr. Philip Brey, e-mail: p.a.e.brey@utwente.nl or phone: +31534894426 or prof. dr. ir. Peter-Paul Verbeek, email: p.p.c.c.verbeek@utwente.nl or phone +31534894460. For a copy of the Ethics of Socially Disruptive Technologies research programme, please make a request to Seeta Autar at b.autar@utwente.nl.

Your application should include a CV (which should include the title of your dissertation and a short description of its contents), a letter of application (including a summary of your teaching evaluations), a writing sample, and contact information for 2 or more references and should be sent no later than February 13th, 2020. Applications should be uploaded through https://www.utwente.nl/en/organization/careers/!/644951/assistant-professor-in- ethics-or-political-philosophy (link at bottom of page). Since only three documents can be uploaded per application, please combine documents if needed.

About the department of philosophy

The philosophy department (https://www.utwente.nl/en/bms/wijsb/) has over 30 members (faculty, postdocs, PhD candidates). It is a thoroughly international department, with English as the main language. It specializes in its research in the philosophical and ethical study of technology and its impact on people, society, and the environment.

We are an equal opportunity employer and value diversity at our university. We are committed to enhancing and sustaining diversity in the composition of our staff. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, marital status, veteran status, or disability status. We will ensure that individuals with disabilities are provided reasonable accommodation to participate in the job application or interview process, to perform essential job functions, and to receive other benefits and privileges of employment. Please contact us to request accommodation.

2020 Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy

Featured

The International Society for Environmental Ethics (ISEE) is pleased to announce publicly the winner and finalists for the Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy.  ISEE established the award to promote work in public philosophy and honor contributions to the field by Dr. Andrew Light, who was recognized for his distinctive work in public environmental philosophy at ISEE’s 2017 annual summer meeting.

With this award, ISEE strives to recognize public philosophers working in environmental ethics and philosophy, broadly construed, and who bring unique insights or methods that broaden the reach, interaction, and engagement of philosophy with the wider public.  This may be exemplified in published work or engagement in environmental issues of public importance.

This year’s honorees have made important contributions and provide distinctive examples of the work in public environmental philosophy that is happening today.

This year’s winner is Professor Paul Thompson of Michigan State University.  Professor Thompson’s work in public philosophy spans multiple decades, and he has made distinctive contributions to agricultural and environmental ethics over the course of his career.  He began working collaboratively with farmers in the 1980s to develop industry reforms that benefited both animals and the environment.  Throughout his career, Professor Thompson’s research has informed and been informed by cross-disciplinary collaborations and community engagement.  He is the author of numerous books, including books aimed for broad audiences, such as From Field to Fork: Food Ethics for Everyone (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015).  Professor Thompson has served on National Resource Council committees and with the National Academy of Engineering’s Center for Engineering Ethics and Society, and he’s played a key role in developing ethical food standards such as American Humane Certified.  In addition, he has helped to build the field of public philosophy and has mentored others developing careers in this field.  As two of his colleagues wrote in their nomination letter, “Many environmental philosophers have come to value public engagement by observing how Paul Thompson incorporated insights from his public work into his more traditionally philosophical articles and books, and we have come to better understand how to become publicly engaged ourselves through his mentoring. Paul, we believe, is an exemplary public environmental philosopher who has made significant contributions at various levels and with various groups, from policymakers, researchers and academic colleagues, to farmers, consumers and environmentalists.”

This year’s finalists are Associate Professor Adam Briggle of University of North Texas, Professor Christopher Preston of University of Montana, and Dr. Gwynne Taraska, Climate Program Director at Ocean Conservancy in Washington, D.C.

Adam Briggle, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion at University of North Texas, describes himself as a “field philosopher.”  In his book, A Field Philosopher’s Guide to Fracking, he argues that “the role of a field philosopher is to excavate and examine the ethical, aesthetic, and even metaphysical presumptions that are inevitably packed into the black box of expert discourse and political messaging.”  Briggle has centered his career around publicly engaged philosophy.  In addition to his academic writing, he has published work in Slate, Salon, and The New York Times, and he is highly active in his community.  His work as founder and President of the Denton Drilling Advisory Group led to a successful campaign to ban hydraulic fracturing in Denton, Texas.  Professor Briggle also serves on the Governing Board for the Public Philosophy Network, and is a member of the Human Rights Campaign’s Parents for Transgender Equality Council.

Christopher Preston, Professor of Philosophy at University of Montana made a distinctive contribution to public philosophy with his recently published a book, The Synthetic Age: Outdesigning Evolution, Resurrecting Species, and Reengineering Our World (MIT Press, 2018). The book, which won a 2019 Nautilus award, aims to spark discussion about the technologies that are reshaping human relations with the broader world.  Preston also runs a related blog – The Plastocene – that aims to generate broader public dialogue about “the big decisions about how to approach a world that has already been impacted so greatly,” because “[d]ecisions about the world we want to create belong to everyone.”  Professor Preston’s public philosophical work has included writing for the BBC, Aeon, The Conversation, and the Center for Humans and Nature, and he has been featured in interviews for numerous news sources, including the BBC, LA Times, and The Guardian.

Gwynne Taraska earned her PhD in philosophy at University of Washington, and shortly thereafter, began to apply her philosophical acumen in the policy arena.  She is currently Climate Program Director at Ocean Conservancy in Washington, D.C.  Dr. Taraska previously served as Director of Policy and Research at Climate Advisers, and as Director of International Climate Policy at the Center for American Progress.  She has worked on a wide range of issues, including climate diplomacy, international climate finance, international ocean diplomacy, the Paris Agreement, and climate loss and damage.  Her work and expertise have been featured in the New York Times, Washington Post, Newsweek, The Hill, Vox, and Energy & Environment.  As one colleague noted: “Gwynne clearly represents the kind of pioneer that we need in public philosophy: someone who has used core philosophical skills to break new ground in the policy community.”

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Postdoctoral Fellow, NYU Shanghai and the Center for Environmental and Animal Protection

Description

NYU Shanghai and the Center for Environmental and Animal Protection (CEAP) at NYU New York invite applications for a Postdoctoral Fellow to work on “Bending the Curve: Meat and Dairy Production and Consumption in China.”  The Postdoctoral Fellow will be jointly supervised by Professor Yifei Li (NYU Shanghai) and Dale Jamieson (CEAP). Postdoctoral Fellow will be based in Shanghai and be part of the NYU Shanghai academic community. We offer a generous compensation package, funds to support research and travel, and aim to offer access to NYU faculty housing.

Bending the Curve is a three-year project focused on understanding present and future trends in animal protein consumption in the PRC and on producing recommendations for actions and policies that would reduce consumption from the “business as usual” projections. The work will involve inventorying and understanding present consumption and trend lines, understanding and inventorying present incentives and disincentives for production and consumption, and providing recommendations and engagement with key stakeholders.  

The responsibilities of the successful applicant will be quite diverse including conducting research, planning workshops, and managing data. The Postdoctoral Fellow will be centrally involved in publishing project results in refereed journals and in preparing occasional briefings for a broader audience.

NYU Shanghai is the third degree-granting campus within New York University’s global network. It is the first higher education joint venture in China authorized to grant degrees that are accredited in the U.S. as well as in China. All teaching is conducted in English. A research university with liberal arts and science at its core, it resides in one of the world’s great cities with a vibrant intellectual community. NYU Shanghai recruits scholars of the highest caliber who are committed to NYU’s global vision of transformative teaching and innovative research and who embody the global society in which we live.

Qualifications

Qualifications include a Ph.D. or equivalent degree in a relevant field, fluency in both English and Chinese, ability to work with both English and Chinese data, and familiarity with multiple methods of social science research.  

Application Instructions

Interested applicants should submit a CV, contact information for three academic referees, and a cover letter addressing research, academic interests, and interest in this project.

Application review will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.  The appointment can begin on May 1st, 2020 and preferably no later than July 1st 2020.  Please visit our website at http://shanghai.nyu.edu/en/about/work-here/open-positions-faculty for instructions and other information on how to apply. If you have any questions, please e-mail shanghai.faculty.recruitment@nyu.edu.

POSTPONED: International Society for Environmental Ethics 17th Annual Summer Meeting

The 17th Annual Summer Meeting will be postponed due to COVID-19 until October 15-18. More information to follow shortly

Call for papers on themes concerning

Action and the Climate Crisis

July 6-9, 2020
H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Blue River, Oregon

This call for papers solicits 500-word proposals for presentations on any topic in environmental philosophy. However, special attention will be given to proposals for talks concerning issues connected with first-order normative claims, initiatives, and action in response to the range of environmental threats connected to climate change, biodiversity loss, mass extinction, pollution, and ecosystem degradation.

An escalating rhetoric of a “crisis” or “emergency” has accompanied an increase of public awareness about harmful climate impacts and degraded environmental conditions. With some regularity, we hear that observed phenomena either meet or exceed the worst-case scenarios within a suite of possible trajectories. Predicted changes in the natural world are unfolding more rapidly than expected, e.g. loss of Arctic ice, and international pledges to act are simply not being met, as global GHG emissions continue to grow. Empirical studies reveal surprising and deeply troubling information about, for example, the collapse of insect and bird populations, while some powerful right-wing and authoritarian political leaders only exacerbate the problems, e.g. Trump’s withdraw from the Paris Agreement and Bolsonaro’s policies of deforestation and development in the Amazon.

In response, there has been growing youth-led, political engagement, exemplified by the international school strikes for climate action and the U.S. Sunrise Movement, as well as a return to non-violent direct action (e.g., by Extinction Rebellion in the UK). One widespread refrain asserts we have only 12 years to radically transform society, which calls for a mobilization equivalent to those made to fight world wars. How should we think about that? While environmental philosophy has traditionally focused on theory, concepts, and ideological frameworks (e.g. conceptions of intrinsic value, anthropocentrism, and environmental justice), the theme of this conference is to focus on praxis, conduct, behavior, and concrete action: How can philosophy help us understand and engage with conditions that call us to action? How can we do activism well in the climate arena, both strategically and ethically? What will future generations, in retrospect, think we should be doing today?

Proposals prepared for blind review should be submitted via email to Allen Thompson, <allen.thompson@oregonstate.edu> no later than March 1st, 2020. Decisions will be announced by April 15th.

ISEE Sessions at APA Central

ISEE will be hosting 2 affiliated group sessions at the 2020 Central Division Meeting of the APA:

Friday, February 28  7:00pm – 10:00pm

Climate Justice

Chair:

Ben Almassi

Speakers:

William Littlefield (Case Western Reserve University) – “Utility Gains in Climate Justice”

Marcus Hedahl (US Naval Academy) – “Climate Justice & Moral Psychology: Surprising Stoic Solutions”

Kizito Michael George (Kyambogo University) – “Linking Climate Change to Human Rights and Social Justice: A Critique of the Ethics and Epistemologies of Climate Change Science”

Rachel Fredericks (Ball State University) – “Climate Legacy: A New(ish) Concept for the Climate Crisis”

Saturday, February 29  2:00pm – 5:00pm

Understanding Community

Chair: Megs Gendreau (Centre College)

Speakers:

Connor Kianpour (Georgia State University) – “Dolphin Ownerhood: Nonhuman Persons and Habitative Noninterference”

Sade Hormio (UC Berkeley) – “Climate Change and Responsibility as Members of Collective Agents”

Justin Donhauser (Bowling Green State University) – “Robot Pollinator Ethics”

Zachary Vereb (University of South Florida) – “A Kantian Perspective on Climate Ethics: History and Global Community”