International Society for Environmental Ethics: 17th Annual Meeting

17th Annual Meeting

International Society for Environmental Ethics

17th Annual Meeting

Oct. 16-18, 2020

(All times are PACIFIC)

Friday, Oct. 16th

Session One – What Do We See Ourselves Doing?

Chair: Alex Lee

      12:30 pm                              Opening Remarks – Allen Thompson, ISEE President

A. 12:45-1:30 pm   Avram Hiller, “‘Effective Environmentalism’: Review & Analysis”

                                                                        Comments: Ida Mullaart 

B. 1:30-2:15 pm                        Kimberly Dill, “A Call to Environmental Reverence”

                                                                        Comments: Chris Diehm

                  *2:30-3:30 pm        Spatial Chat – open for general discussion

                  *3:00-4:00 pm        ISEE Mentoring Initiative (all welcome)

                                                                        with Marion Hourdequin & Simona Capisani

Session Two – Keynote Address

Chair: Allen Thompson

Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality

A. 4:30-6:00 pm                       Prof. Christine Cuomo (Title TBA)

B. 6:00-7:00 pm                        Spatial Chat –  for discussion / cocktail hour

Saturday, Oct. 17th

Session Three – Animals and Politics

Chair: Steve Vogel

8:50 am                    Opening Remarks – Allen Thompson, ISEE President

A. 9:00-9:45 am     Danny Weltman, “Animal Rescue: Civil Disobedience or Subrevolution?”

                                                                        Comments: Kristian Cantens

B. 9:45-10:30 am   Dennis Papadopoulos, ” Wild Animals’ Political Resistance”

                                                                        Comments: Jeremy Bendik-Keymer

                  Lunch Break (total time between sessions = 3 hours)

                  *10:30-11:30 am   Spatial Chat – open for general discussion

                  *12:00-1:00 pm                       Philosophers for Sustainability (all welcome)

                                                                                          with Eugene Chislenko & Rebecca Millsop

                                                                                          <philosophersforsustainability.com>

Session Four – Virtues and Radicalism

 Chair: Megs Gendreau

A. 1:30-2:15 pm                       Allison Fritz, “The Virtue of Shallow Environmentalism”

                                                                        Comments: Blake Francis

B. 2:15-3:00 pm                        Kristian Cantens, “Cultivating the Virtue of Self-Wildness”

                                                                        Comments: Christopher Rice

                  Half Hour Break

C. 3:30-4:15 pm                        Benjamin Hole, “Radical Virtue and Climate Action”

                                                                        Comments: Allison Fritz

D. 4:15-5:00 pm                       Sarah Warren, “Radical Empiricism, Radical Transformation”

                                                                        Comments: Espen Dyrnes Stabell

                  *5:00-6:30 pm        Spatial Chat – open for general discussion and socializing

Sunday, Oct. 18th

Session Five – Activism and Injustice

Chair: Marion Hourdequin

8:50 am                    Opening Remarks – Allen Thompson, ISEE President

A. 9:00 -9:45 am    Benjamin Howe, “Is it Right to Get Your Hands Dirty Fighting Climate Change?”

                                                                        Comments: Danny Weltman

B. 9:45-10:30 am   Blake Francis, “Climate Change Injustice”

                                                                        Comments: Ken Shockley

                  Lunch Break (total time between sessions = 3 hours)

                  *10:30 am-11:30 pm             Spatial Chat – open for general discussion

                  *11:30 am-1:15 pm                ISEE Business Meeting (all welcome)

                                                                                          Discussing matters of the Society

Session Six – How We Relate to the Wild

Chair: Robert Earl

A. 1:30-2:15 pm                       Ida Mullaart, “The Problem with Overpopulation”

                                                                        Comments: Benjamin Hole

B. 2:15-3:00 pm                        Chris Diehm, “Connection to Conservation”

                                                                        Comments: Avram Hiller

                  Half Hour Break

C. 3:30-4:15 pm                        Jeremy Bendik-Keymer, “The Other Species Capability & the Power of Wonder”

                                                                        Comments: Kimberly Dill

                  Closing Remarks: Allen Thompson, ISEE President

                  *4:40-6:00 pm        Spatial Chat – open for general discussion and goodbyes

CFP: International Society for Environmental Ethics

Featured

CALL FOR PAPERS

for the

International Society for Environmental Ethics

18th Annual Summer Meeting

Wednesday, 30th June

to Saturday 3rd July, 2021

at the

Archipelago Research Institute,

Centre for Environmental Research,

University of Turku,

Seili Island, Finland

on questions of

Space, Relations, and Populations

The 18th annual summer meeting of the International Society for Environmental Ethics will convene from Wednesday 30th June to Saturday 3rd July 2021, at Seili island, Finland, situated in Finnish Archipelago, in a historical 17th century leper-colony-turned-mental-asylum-turned-research-station.

This call for papers solicits 500-word proposals for presentations in any topic in environmental philosophy. However, special attention will be given to proposals for talks concerning issues related to the philosophical investigation of the intersection of environmental conditions of space, relations, and populations.

The planet is becoming more and more populated with human beings, which reduces the space available to other species and displaces them from their traditional habitats. At the same time, the Covid-19 pandemic seems to intersect with the way we occupy the space available – the expansion of human populations into previously wild places promises to only increase the threat of new pandemics. The corona virus is transmitted via shared social spaces, so we combat transmission by isolation and physical distancing. Are emergent and contested norms about “social distancing,” then, a new framework for coordinating collective action? Would some kind of “ecological distancing” be a logical next step? Questions about how we occupy space and our spatial relations to other beings, on an increasingly crowded planet, call for articulation and philosophical analysis.

We are exceeding the carrying capacity and limits of this planet in multiple and very tangible ways. There seems to be a need, then, for more space. How should we think about occupying the space available? Should we prioritize protection and restoration of habitats for the conservation of endangered species? Should the abundant human population be squeezed more tightly into urban spaces? Or should we learn to share the landscape with wild animals, domestic animals, ecosystems, and other humans? Won’t this call for control of human population growth? Is space exploration and colonization ultimately the key to solving our environmental problems on this planet, or is it just a technological fantasy?

Possible topics include questions relating to biodiversity loss, environmental protection and conservation, population ethics, anthropocentric land use, space exploration and colonization, and pandemics. We encourage imaginative thinking about how questions about spatial relations could shed new light upon questions in environmental ethics and philosophy.

To accommodate discussion on population and space, the meeting is hosted in a place which itself is an intriguing combination of secluded, restricted human population and abundant, verdant nature. The nature of Turku Archipelago offers exotic experiences of achingly lush yet ascetic Finnish summer, while the nearby city of Turku offers cultural experiences all the way from 13th century to this day. In addition to the beautiful natural environment, Seili island has a dark yet interesting history of isolation as a former leper colony. The venue itself, located in the island, is an old 17th century hospital building and its utility buildings, now used by the researchers of University of Turku. These historical buildings will accommodate us for the meeting. Off-session, we can enjoy the Nordic and Finnish nature, culture and history of the area. To reach the island and back to mainland, we will share a two-hour ferry through the picturesque archipelago, departing from Turku city center.

For more information about the venue, see https://www.visitseili.fi/en/accommodation/

Proposals prepared for blind review should be submitted via email to Mikko M. Puumala,

<mimapuu@utu.fi> no later than December 15th, 2020. Decisions will be announced by February 30th, 2021. Draft papers for pre-read by conference participants will be due May 31st, 2021.

Please note that while the meeting is planned to take place live, we are closely following the COVID-19 situation in Finland and other countries. We will put updates to ISEE website: https://enviroethics.org/

AWARD ANNOUNCEMENT:Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics

Featured

AWARD ANNOUNCEMENT:

Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics

Chris Cuomo Keynote Presentation at 17th Annual ISEE Meeting

To help build a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive field of environmental ethics, the International Society for Environmental Ethics seeks to highlight intersectional scholarship in environmental philosophy. This includes, but is not limited to, work that examines linkages between environmental philosophy, feminist and gender studies, critical race theory, Indigenous studies, and disability studies. ISEE aims to support research, teaching, and service that extend the scope of environmental ethics to incorporate perspectives and methods that have been historically marginalized or excluded from environmental philosophy as a discipline, and that address questions of epistemic justice, such as the devaluation of certain forms of knowledge within academic environmental philosophy, barriers to and opportunities for developing more inclusive perspectives, and approaches to respectfully collaborating across perspectives and traditions. We seek to honor and advance work that brings different threads of philosophy and environmental thought together.

In support of these aims, we establish the Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics.

Victoria Davion was raised in New York City, earned her Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1989 and joined the department of Philosophy at the University of Georgia in 1990. She became the first woman to become a full professor in Philosophy at UGA, and the first woman to be appointed department head in 2005, a position she held until her death in 2017. She became widely known for her cutting-edge interdisciplinary work in feminist and environmental ethics, where she made truly transformative contributions, and was a beloved teacher and mentor to many who were inspired by her engaging, accessible, and innovative teaching methods. She presented and published on a breadth of philosophical areas including political philosophy, power and privilege, healthcare, nuclear deterrence, artificial intelligence, abortion, whiteness, and technology. She co-edited The Idea of a Political Liberalism: Essays on Rawls (2000) and was an associate editor of the Encyclopedia of Environmental Ethics (2009). A lover of nonhuman animals, music, and travel, as well as a witty, engaging, generous, and astute person, Vicky also made a far-reaching impact as the founder and editor of the journal, Ethics & the Environment , which she first published in 1995 and which continues as a highly influential journal today.

In helping to catalyze and bring forth intersectional understanding within environmental philosophy, her contribution inspires this Award and all those whose accomplishments it recognizes.

ISEE is pleased to announce that Prof. Chris Cuomo is the recipient of the inaugural Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics. Dr. Cuomo is Professor of Philosophy and Women’s at the University of Georgia, where she is an affiliated faculty with the Institute for African American Studies, the Institute for Native American Studies, the Environmental Ethics Certificate Program, and the Initiative on Climate and Society. Cuomo has made substantial contributions in the areas and intersections of feminist theory, environmental philosophy, philosophy of science, philosophy of race, climate justice, postcolonial thought, Indigenous knowledge, and activism.

In addition to many journal articles and book chapters, Cuomo is the author of Feminism and Ecological Communities: An Ethic of Flourishing (Routledge 1998) and The Philosopher Queen: Feminist Essays on War, Love, and Knowledge (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers 2002), co-author of the Feminist Philosophy Reader (McGraw Hill 2007), and co-editor of Whiteness: Feminist Philosophical Reflections (Rowman & Littlefield 1999).

On October 16, 2020 Prof. Chris Cuomo will deliver the keynote presentation at the 17th Annual ISEE Conference and will be awarded with the 2020 Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics.

Climate Change and COVID-19

Todd Dufresne explores the relationship between climate change and COVID-19 in a new interview series. The series follows-up on Dufresne’s recent book, The Democracy of Suffering: Life on the Edge of Catastrophe, Philosophy in the Anthropocene (MQUP 2019).  

Part One: http://epiloguemag.com/2020/05/pandemic-as-prophecy/

Part Two: http://epiloguemag.com/2020/05/shifting-consciousness/

ISEE Mentoring Initiative, Update on 50th Earth Day 2020 (April 22)

 

The new ISEE Mentoring Initiative is moving forward, and this year we’ve focused on supporting environmental philosophy teaching.  We are in the process of updating teaching resources on the ISEE website with new syllabi, assignments, and activities (thanks to all who contributed!), and the updated site is expected to go live by early May.  We also organized a workshop on engaged and inclusive pedagogies in environmental philosophy for the 2020 Pacific APA (cancelled due to the pandemic), which we hope to reschedule either in-person or virtually during the 2020-21 academic year.

Simona Capisani (UC-Irvine) is directing the Mentoring Initiative along with ISEE Vice President Marion Hourdequin, and we have a wonderful group of participants who are helping contribute to and shape our projects going forward.  ISEE members who would like to get involved are encouraged to email Marion Hourdequin (mhourdequin@coloradocollege.edu) and to keep an eye out for announcements of upcoming virtual mentoring committee meetings on the ISEE listserv.  We expect to hold our next meeting in May or June.  Stay tuned!

Teaching Environmental Philosophy: Engaged and Inclusive Pedagogies

Organizers:

Simona Capisani, University of California-Irvine and Marion Hourdequin, Colorado College

This workshop aims to provide both new and experienced faculty the opportunity to explore engaged and inclusive teaching approaches and pedagogies in environmental philosophy.  The workshop will provide resources for teaching stand-alone classes focused on environmental ethics, environmental philosophy, and environmental justice, as well as ideas for integrating environmental dimensions into existing courses such as political philosophy, philosophy of science, aesthetics, and epistemology.  In the first hour of the workshop, panelists will share ideas for inclusive teaching, community-engaged learning, and student-centered pedagogies in environmental philosophy, followed by a moderated discussion/Q&A.  The second hour of the workshop will give participants the opportunity to discuss course syllabi and share ideas for environmental philosophy teaching in multiple contexts, including environmental ethics and environmental justice courses, as well as environmentally-related units in other philosophy classes.  Participants are encouraged to bring complete or draft syllabi to share, and to contribute ideas as part of a collaborative conversation.

The following speakers are confirmed as panelists:

 

Chris Cuomo, Professor of Philosophy and Women’s Studies, University of Georgia

https://www.phil.uga.edu/directory/people/chris-cuomo

 

Rebeka Fereirra, Tenured Instructor, Green River College

https://sites.google.com/view/rebekadferreira/about-me

 

Benjamin Hole, Visiting Assistant Professor, Pacific University

https://www.pacificu.edu/about/directory/people/benjamin-hole-phd

 

Clair Morrissey, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Occidental College

https://www.oxy.edu/academics/faculty/clair-morrissey

 

2020 Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy

Featured

The International Society for Environmental Ethics (ISEE) is pleased to announce publicly the winner and finalists for the Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy.  ISEE established the award to promote work in public philosophy and honor contributions to the field by Dr. Andrew Light, who was recognized for his distinctive work in public environmental philosophy at ISEE’s 2017 annual summer meeting.

With this award, ISEE strives to recognize public philosophers working in environmental ethics and philosophy, broadly construed, and who bring unique insights or methods that broaden the reach, interaction, and engagement of philosophy with the wider public.  This may be exemplified in published work or engagement in environmental issues of public importance.

This year’s honorees have made important contributions and provide distinctive examples of the work in public environmental philosophy that is happening today.

This year’s winner is Professor Paul Thompson of Michigan State University.  Professor Thompson’s work in public philosophy spans multiple decades, and he has made distinctive contributions to agricultural and environmental ethics over the course of his career.  He began working collaboratively with farmers in the 1980s to develop industry reforms that benefited both animals and the environment.  Throughout his career, Professor Thompson’s research has informed and been informed by cross-disciplinary collaborations and community engagement.  He is the author of numerous books, including books aimed for broad audiences, such as From Field to Fork: Food Ethics for Everyone (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015).  Professor Thompson has served on National Resource Council committees and with the National Academy of Engineering’s Center for Engineering Ethics and Society, and he’s played a key role in developing ethical food standards such as American Humane Certified.  In addition, he has helped to build the field of public philosophy and has mentored others developing careers in this field.  As two of his colleagues wrote in their nomination letter, “Many environmental philosophers have come to value public engagement by observing how Paul Thompson incorporated insights from his public work into his more traditionally philosophical articles and books, and we have come to better understand how to become publicly engaged ourselves through his mentoring. Paul, we believe, is an exemplary public environmental philosopher who has made significant contributions at various levels and with various groups, from policymakers, researchers and academic colleagues, to farmers, consumers and environmentalists.”

This year’s finalists are Associate Professor Adam Briggle of University of North Texas, Professor Christopher Preston of University of Montana, and Dr. Gwynne Taraska, Climate Program Director at Ocean Conservancy in Washington, D.C.

Adam Briggle, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion at University of North Texas, describes himself as a “field philosopher.”  In his book, A Field Philosopher’s Guide to Fracking, he argues that “the role of a field philosopher is to excavate and examine the ethical, aesthetic, and even metaphysical presumptions that are inevitably packed into the black box of expert discourse and political messaging.”  Briggle has centered his career around publicly engaged philosophy.  In addition to his academic writing, he has published work in Slate, Salon, and The New York Times, and he is highly active in his community.  His work as founder and President of the Denton Drilling Advisory Group led to a successful campaign to ban hydraulic fracturing in Denton, Texas.  Professor Briggle also serves on the Governing Board for the Public Philosophy Network, and is a member of the Human Rights Campaign’s Parents for Transgender Equality Council.

Christopher Preston, Professor of Philosophy at University of Montana made a distinctive contribution to public philosophy with his recently published a book, The Synthetic Age: Outdesigning Evolution, Resurrecting Species, and Reengineering Our World (MIT Press, 2018). The book, which won a 2019 Nautilus award, aims to spark discussion about the technologies that are reshaping human relations with the broader world.  Preston also runs a related blog – The Plastocene – that aims to generate broader public dialogue about “the big decisions about how to approach a world that has already been impacted so greatly,” because “[d]ecisions about the world we want to create belong to everyone.”  Professor Preston’s public philosophical work has included writing for the BBC, Aeon, The Conversation, and the Center for Humans and Nature, and he has been featured in interviews for numerous news sources, including the BBC, LA Times, and The Guardian.

Gwynne Taraska earned her PhD in philosophy at University of Washington, and shortly thereafter, began to apply her philosophical acumen in the policy arena.  She is currently Climate Program Director at Ocean Conservancy in Washington, D.C.  Dr. Taraska previously served as Director of Policy and Research at Climate Advisers, and as Director of International Climate Policy at the Center for American Progress.  She has worked on a wide range of issues, including climate diplomacy, international climate finance, international ocean diplomacy, the Paris Agreement, and climate loss and damage.  Her work and expertise have been featured in the New York Times, Washington Post, Newsweek, The Hill, Vox, and Energy & Environment.  As one colleague noted: “Gwynne clearly represents the kind of pioneer that we need in public philosophy: someone who has used core philosophical skills to break new ground in the policy community.”

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