Call for Nominations: 2020 ISEE Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy

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Call for Nominations for the

2020 ISEE Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy

 The International Society for Environmental Ethics established an award to promote work in public philosophy and honor contributions to the field by Dr. Andrew Light, who received the inaugural award in his name at our 2017 annual summer meeting.

With this call, the Society seeks nominations for the Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy. We strive to recognize public philosophers working in environmental ethics and philosophy, broadly construed, those who are working to bring unique insights or methods to broaden the reach, interaction, and engagement of public philosophy with the wider public.  This may be exemplified in published work or engagement in environmental issues of public importance.

The award is offered without prejudice to stage of career and may be demonstrated by singular work, or engagement of importance, or over a career.  It is important to note that early career scholars are viable candidates and their nominations strongly encouraged. Self-nominations are welcome.

Nominations should include:

(a) A letter of nomination, listing the name, affiliation (if any), and contact information of both the nominee and nominator. The letter should explain how and why the nominee qualifies for the award;

(b) The nominee’s curriculum vitae or professional resume.

Nominations may also include:

(c) Descriptions and representative samples of work in public philosophy, such as op-eds, public presentations, descriptions of philosophically driven civic interactions, or alternative media engagements (blogs, videos, podcasts, etc.) or work about the public importance of environmental philosophy in professional journals;

(d) Additional letters of endorsement for the nomination, no more than two.

 

Nominations assembling these materials into one Adobe Acrobat PDF file are strongly preferred.

Nominations previously submitted for the 2019 Award may be reactivated. Please contact us, as below.

Nominations are due by October 1, 2020. They will be evaluated by ISEE Officers and members of the ISEE Nominating Committee.

 

Send nominations to ISEE President Allen Thompson via email:  allen.thompson@oregonstate.edu

Announcement of the winner and finalists will be made at the ISEE group session meeting during the Eastern Division American Philosophical Assoc., Jan. 4-7, 2021. The award includes a financial prize.

2020 Call for Papers: Holmes Rolston III Early Career Essay Prize in Environmental Philosophy

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To mark the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day, the ISEE and the Center for Environmental Philosophy are re-issuing an essay prize for scholars in the early stages of their career.

The prize is named in honor of Professor Holmes Rolston III, for his pioneering work in the field of environmental philosophy. Papers are invited on all aspects of environmental philosophy or environmental affairs (with a strong theoretical component).

A prize of $500 will be awarded to the winning essay. All submitted papers that qualify (see conditions) will be reviewed by an Essay Prize Committee in consultation with the Editorial Board of Environmental Ethics. The winning essay will be published in the journal Environmental Ethics.

Scholars who have earned their doctorate no more than five years prior to submission are invited to submit an essay. Submissions must be accompanied by a one-page CV to provide evidence of early career status.

The closing date for submissions is August 1st, 2020.

The word limit is 60,000 characters (including spaces), including notes and references. An abstract of 100-150 words should also be included. For style, consult the Chicago Manual of Style or any recent issue of Environmental Ethics. Essays must be prepared for blind review (cover page with contact information and email on a separate page). Submissions should be emailed to ISEE President Allen Thompson at: <allen.thompson@oregonstate.edu>. Please put ‘Essay Prize’ in the subject line of the email submission. The essay should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere, and should not be submitted to any other journal until the outcome of the competition is announced. The decision of the committee will be final. There is only one prize per year, and the committee reserves the right not to award the prize if submissions are not of an appropriate standard.

 

ISEE Mentoring Initiative, Update on 50th Earth Day 2020 (April 22)

 

The new ISEE Mentoring Initiative is moving forward, and this year we’ve focused on supporting environmental philosophy teaching.  We are in the process of updating teaching resources on the ISEE website with new syllabi, assignments, and activities (thanks to all who contributed!), and the updated site is expected to go live by early May.  We also organized a workshop on engaged and inclusive pedagogies in environmental philosophy for the 2020 Pacific APA (cancelled due to the pandemic), which we hope to reschedule either in-person or virtually during the 2020-21 academic year.

Simona Capisani (UC-Irvine) is directing the Mentoring Initiative along with ISEE Vice President Marion Hourdequin, and we have a wonderful group of participants who are helping contribute to and shape our projects going forward.  ISEE members who would like to get involved are encouraged to email Marion Hourdequin (mhourdequin@coloradocollege.edu) and to keep an eye out for announcements of upcoming virtual mentoring committee meetings on the ISEE listserv.  We expect to hold our next meeting in May or June.  Stay tuned!

Teaching Environmental Philosophy: Engaged and Inclusive Pedagogies

Organizers:

Simona Capisani, University of California-Irvine and Marion Hourdequin, Colorado College

This workshop aims to provide both new and experienced faculty the opportunity to explore engaged and inclusive teaching approaches and pedagogies in environmental philosophy.  The workshop will provide resources for teaching stand-alone classes focused on environmental ethics, environmental philosophy, and environmental justice, as well as ideas for integrating environmental dimensions into existing courses such as political philosophy, philosophy of science, aesthetics, and epistemology.  In the first hour of the workshop, panelists will share ideas for inclusive teaching, community-engaged learning, and student-centered pedagogies in environmental philosophy, followed by a moderated discussion/Q&A.  The second hour of the workshop will give participants the opportunity to discuss course syllabi and share ideas for environmental philosophy teaching in multiple contexts, including environmental ethics and environmental justice courses, as well as environmentally-related units in other philosophy classes.  Participants are encouraged to bring complete or draft syllabi to share, and to contribute ideas as part of a collaborative conversation.

The following speakers are confirmed as panelists:

 

Chris Cuomo, Professor of Philosophy and Women’s Studies, University of Georgia

https://www.phil.uga.edu/directory/people/chris-cuomo

 

Rebeka Fereirra, Tenured Instructor, Green River College

https://sites.google.com/view/rebekadferreira/about-me

 

Benjamin Hole, Visiting Assistant Professor, Pacific University

https://www.pacificu.edu/about/directory/people/benjamin-hole-phd

 

Clair Morrissey, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Occidental College

https://www.oxy.edu/academics/faculty/clair-morrissey

 

2020 Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy

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The International Society for Environmental Ethics (ISEE) is pleased to announce publicly the winner and finalists for the Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy.  ISEE established the award to promote work in public philosophy and honor contributions to the field by Dr. Andrew Light, who was recognized for his distinctive work in public environmental philosophy at ISEE’s 2017 annual summer meeting.

With this award, ISEE strives to recognize public philosophers working in environmental ethics and philosophy, broadly construed, and who bring unique insights or methods that broaden the reach, interaction, and engagement of philosophy with the wider public.  This may be exemplified in published work or engagement in environmental issues of public importance.

This year’s honorees have made important contributions and provide distinctive examples of the work in public environmental philosophy that is happening today.

This year’s winner is Professor Paul Thompson of Michigan State University.  Professor Thompson’s work in public philosophy spans multiple decades, and he has made distinctive contributions to agricultural and environmental ethics over the course of his career.  He began working collaboratively with farmers in the 1980s to develop industry reforms that benefited both animals and the environment.  Throughout his career, Professor Thompson’s research has informed and been informed by cross-disciplinary collaborations and community engagement.  He is the author of numerous books, including books aimed for broad audiences, such as From Field to Fork: Food Ethics for Everyone (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015).  Professor Thompson has served on National Resource Council committees and with the National Academy of Engineering’s Center for Engineering Ethics and Society, and he’s played a key role in developing ethical food standards such as American Humane Certified.  In addition, he has helped to build the field of public philosophy and has mentored others developing careers in this field.  As two of his colleagues wrote in their nomination letter, “Many environmental philosophers have come to value public engagement by observing how Paul Thompson incorporated insights from his public work into his more traditionally philosophical articles and books, and we have come to better understand how to become publicly engaged ourselves through his mentoring. Paul, we believe, is an exemplary public environmental philosopher who has made significant contributions at various levels and with various groups, from policymakers, researchers and academic colleagues, to farmers, consumers and environmentalists.”

This year’s finalists are Associate Professor Adam Briggle of University of North Texas, Professor Christopher Preston of University of Montana, and Dr. Gwynne Taraska, Climate Program Director at Ocean Conservancy in Washington, D.C.

Adam Briggle, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion at University of North Texas, describes himself as a “field philosopher.”  In his book, A Field Philosopher’s Guide to Fracking, he argues that “the role of a field philosopher is to excavate and examine the ethical, aesthetic, and even metaphysical presumptions that are inevitably packed into the black box of expert discourse and political messaging.”  Briggle has centered his career around publicly engaged philosophy.  In addition to his academic writing, he has published work in Slate, Salon, and The New York Times, and he is highly active in his community.  His work as founder and President of the Denton Drilling Advisory Group led to a successful campaign to ban hydraulic fracturing in Denton, Texas.  Professor Briggle also serves on the Governing Board for the Public Philosophy Network, and is a member of the Human Rights Campaign’s Parents for Transgender Equality Council.

Christopher Preston, Professor of Philosophy at University of Montana made a distinctive contribution to public philosophy with his recently published a book, The Synthetic Age: Outdesigning Evolution, Resurrecting Species, and Reengineering Our World (MIT Press, 2018). The book, which won a 2019 Nautilus award, aims to spark discussion about the technologies that are reshaping human relations with the broader world.  Preston also runs a related blog – The Plastocene – that aims to generate broader public dialogue about “the big decisions about how to approach a world that has already been impacted so greatly,” because “[d]ecisions about the world we want to create belong to everyone.”  Professor Preston’s public philosophical work has included writing for the BBC, Aeon, The Conversation, and the Center for Humans and Nature, and he has been featured in interviews for numerous news sources, including the BBC, LA Times, and The Guardian.

Gwynne Taraska earned her PhD in philosophy at University of Washington, and shortly thereafter, began to apply her philosophical acumen in the policy arena.  She is currently Climate Program Director at Ocean Conservancy in Washington, D.C.  Dr. Taraska previously served as Director of Policy and Research at Climate Advisers, and as Director of International Climate Policy at the Center for American Progress.  She has worked on a wide range of issues, including climate diplomacy, international climate finance, international ocean diplomacy, the Paris Agreement, and climate loss and damage.  Her work and expertise have been featured in the New York Times, Washington Post, Newsweek, The Hill, Vox, and Energy & Environment.  As one colleague noted: “Gwynne clearly represents the kind of pioneer that we need in public philosophy: someone who has used core philosophical skills to break new ground in the policy community.”

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