CFP: International Society for Environmental Ethics 17th Annual Summer Meeting

Featured

Call for papers on themes concerning

Action and the Climate Crisis

July 6-9, 2020
H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Blue River, Oregon

This call for papers solicits 500-word proposals for presentations on any topic in environmental philosophy. However, special attention will be given to proposals for talks concerning issues connected with first-order normative claims, initiatives, and action in response to the range of environmental threats connected to climate change, biodiversity loss, mass extinction, pollution, and ecosystem degradation.

An escalating rhetoric of a “crisis” or “emergency” has accompanied an increase of public awareness about harmful climate impacts and degraded environmental conditions. With some regularity, we hear that observed phenomena either meet or exceed the worst-case scenarios within a suite of possible trajectories. Predicted changes in the natural world are unfolding more rapidly than expected, e.g. loss of Arctic ice, and international pledges to act are simply not being met, as global GHG emissions continue to grow. Empirical studies reveal surprising and deeply troubling information about, for example, the collapse of insect and bird populations, while some powerful right-wing and authoritarian political leaders only exacerbate the problems, e.g. Trump’s withdraw from the Paris Agreement and Bolsonaro’s policies of deforestation and development in the Amazon.

In response, there has been growing youth-led, political engagement, exemplified by the international school strikes for climate action and the U.S. Sunrise Movement, as well as a return to non-violent direct action (e.g., by Extinction Rebellion in the UK). One widespread refrain asserts we have only 12 years to radically transform society, which calls for a mobilization equivalent to those made to fight world wars. How should we think about that? While environmental philosophy has traditionally focused on theory, concepts, and ideological frameworks (e.g. conceptions of intrinsic value, anthropocentrism, and environmental justice), the theme of this conference is to focus on praxis, conduct, behavior, and concrete action: How can philosophy help us understand and engage with conditions that call us to action? How can we do activism well in the climate arena, both strategically and ethically? What will future generations, in retrospect, think we should be doing today?

Proposals prepared for blind review should be submitted via email to Allen Thompson, <allen.thompson@oregonstate.edu> no later than March 1st, 2020. Decisions will be announced by April 15th.

ISEE Sessions at APA Central

Featured

ISEE will be hosting 2 affiliated group sessions at the 2020 Central Division Meeting of the APA:

Friday, February 28  7:00pm – 10:00pm

Climate Justice

Chair:

Ben Almassi

Speakers:

William Littlefield (Case Western Reserve University) – “Utility Gains in Climate Justice”

Marcus Hedahl (US Naval Academy) – “Climate Justice & Moral Psychology: Surprising Stoic Solutions”

Kizito Michael George (Kyambogo University) – “Linking Climate Change to Human Rights and Social Justice: A Critique of the Ethics and Epistemologies of Climate Change Science”

Rachel Fredericks (Ball State University) – “Climate Legacy: A New(ish) Concept for the Climate Crisis”

Saturday, February 29  2:00pm – 5:00pm

Understanding Community

Chair: Megs Gendreau (Centre College)

Speakers:

Connor Kianpour (Georgia State University) – “Dolphin Ownerhood: Nonhuman Persons and Habitative Noninterference”

Sade Hormio (UC Berkeley) – “Climate Change and Responsibility as Members of Collective Agents”

Justin Donhauser (Bowling Green State University) – “Robot Pollinator Ethics”

Zachary Vereb (University of South Florida) – “A Kantian Perspective on Climate Ethics: History and Global Community” 

ISEE Sessions at APA Pacific

Featured

The 2020 Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association will be April 8th to 11th at the Westin St. Francis in San Francisco, CA. 

ISEE will be hosting two affiliated group sessions.

Session 1: Wednesday April 8th from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Teaching Environmental Philosophy: Engaged and Inclusive Pedagogies

Chairs: Simona Capisani (University of California, Irvine)
Marion Hourdenquin (Colorado College)
Panelists: Chris Cuomo (University of Georgia)
Rebeka Ferreira (Green River College)
Benjamin Hole (Pacific University)
Clair Morrissey (Occidental College)

Session 2: Saturday April 11th from 6:00 to 8:00

Environmental Ethics: Ethics for a Changing World

Speakers:

Arthur Obst (University of Washington) – “Demandingness from Despair”

Daniel Callies (University of California, San Diego) and Yasha Rohwer (Oregon Institute of Technology) – “Intentionally Eradicating a Species: Examining the Case against and the Value of Anopheles Gambiae”

Blake Francis (University of Maryland Baltimore County) – “Middle Emissions: Climate Ethics and the Global Middle Class”

ISEE Sessions at APA Eastern

Featured

Workshop on Sustainability in Philosophy

Friday, January 10, 2020, 9-11 am

This session will open with a special announcement of this year’s finalists and winner of ISEE’s Andrew Light Award in Public Philosophy.  Professor Light will present the award.  

Following the award presentation, the workshop will be led by co-founders of Philosophers for Sustainability (PfS), Eugene Chislenko of Temple University and Rebecca Millsop of University of Rhode Island.  Professors Millsop and Chislenko will describe several recent initiatives of Philosophers for Sustainability and lead a discussion of effective ways to integrate sustainability into teaching, research, and service. The workshop will include discussion of a proposed set of Guidelines for Sustainable Practices in Philosophy, developed by PfS and under consideration by the APA for inclusion in its Good Practices Guide.

Environmental Ethics in Social Context:

Robots, Gene Drives, and Water Management

Saturday, January 11, 2020, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

 

Chair: Marion Hourdequin

Speakers:

Justin Donhauser (Bowling Green University) “Environmental Robot Virtues?”

Zahra Meghani (University of Rhode Island), “An Approach for Evaluating Arguments for the Environmental Release of Genetically Engineered Animals with Gene Drives”

Gehad Abdelal (University of Georgia) “Water Ethics: The Problem of Uncertainty and Colonial Implication on the Nile River Conflict”

Colloquium to celebrate the 250th anniversary of Alexander von Humboldt

Thom Heyd, long-time member of ISEE and co-representative of ISEE in Canada, has organised a Colloquium to celebrate the 250th anniversary of Alexander von Humboldt. The aim of the event is to open a discussion on the importance of Humboldt’s integrative approach to science and the planet at this time when we try to confront the reality of the Anthropocene. It takes place on 13-14 September 2019 at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Further information may be found at https://www.uvic.ca/socialsciences/geography/assets/docs/von-humboldt-anthropocene.pdf.

 

Workshop – Politics of Wonder: Difference and Dignity in Nature and Society

The University of Exeter’s Centre for Political Thought and Egenis: The Centre for the Study of Life Sciences are pleased to announce an interdisciplinary workshop:

Politics of Wonder: Difference and Dignity in Nature and Society

Half-day workshop, Thurs 12th September 2019, University of Exeter, UK

 

Synopsis

In her work on the ethics of non-human species, Martha Nussbaum has argued that an attitude of wonder should play a central role in our dealings with the world of living nature. For Nussbaum, wonder at a being’s particular form of life enables us to recognize it as a subject of dignity, worthy of respect and consideration in various ways.

This workshop will explore applications of this idea to human socio-political relations. If wonder at the diversity of life in general can open up our perception of the scope of dignity and respect, can wonder in the context of human difference enhance respect between people? What are the implications for our understanding of political judgment, the conditions of democratic politics, or positive trans-cultural relations? More fundamentally, what should we understand by ‘wonder’, and what roles can it be expected to play in the context of the political?

The workshop will consist of a series of papers addressing these issues, from scholars working in political thought, environmental ethics, philosophy of biology, and related areas. Participants from all disciplines are very welcome. Registration is free, but space is limited – please contact Jack Griffiths (j.griffiths3@exeter.ac.uk) to register, or for more information.

 

Confirmed speakers

Prof. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (Case Western Reserve University, Ohio, USA)

Prof. Amy Linch (Pennsylvania State University, USA)

Dr. Urszula Lisowska (University of Wrocław, Poland)

Prof. Christopher Gill (University of Exeter, UK)

Dr. Jack Griffiths (University of Exeter, UK)

 

Schedule

Thursday 12th September: 14:00-18:30. Followed by drinks and dinner. There will also be a concluding session on Friday morning (10:00-12:00) for the speakers and any interested participants.

Location: Byrne House, Streatham Campus, University of Exeter.

Map available here: https://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/events/details/index.php?event=9460

 

Workshop sponsored by

The Centre for Political Thought: https://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/politics/research/centres/cpt/

Egenis: The Centre for the Study of Life Sciences: http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/sociology/research/sts/egenis/