CFP: Fifteenth Annual Meeting ISEE on Environmental Philosophy



Fifteenth Annual Meeting on Environmental Philosophy

Environmental Justice and Extreme Environments”

 Conference Dates: June 27-30 2018

The International Society for Environmental Ethics (ISEE) will hold its Fifteenth Annual Meeting on Environmental Philosophy, June 27-30, 2018, in Anchorage, Alaska. Come to great north!

The theme for this year’s conference is Environmental Justice and Extreme Environments, though ISEE invites proposals for individual papers and group sessions on any topic in environmental philosophy, broadly conceived. Relevant topics might include papers addressing:

* indigenous justice

* climate ethics

* animal and species justice

* changing ecosystems

* sea ice loss

However, proposals on any topic in environmental philosophy are welcome.

Participants in the conference only should expect to arrive on June 27 for conference opening remarks and talks in the evening. We aim to close the conference after a session or two the morning of June 30.


Instructions for Submissions:

  • Please anonymize all paper abstracts (including PDF submissions)

  • Please do not submit panels without a participation commitment from all proposed participants

  • Full papers must be available on the ISEE website one month prior to the conference. Papers will be summarized by respondents at the conference rather than read in their entirety, in order to maximize time for discussion and provide authors with constructive feedback.

Deadline:  March 15, 2018

Submissions and Inquiries should be sent to the organizers:

President, Benjamin Hale,

Vice-President, Allen Thompson,

Secretary, Alex Lee ,


June 22-24, 2018
Delta Hotel and Resort
475 President Kennedy Avenue
Montreal QC H3A 1J7


The Interdisciplinary Environmental Association (IEA) invites you to participate in the 23rd International Interdisciplinary Conference on the Environment (IICE)! The conference is motivated by the increasing need to combine ideas and research findings from different disciplines to enhance our understanding of the interactions between the natural environment and human institutions. Conference presentations focus on:

  • What all disciplines have to offer with respect to understanding environmental and resource problems;
  • Possible solutions that are available;
  • The implications of the globalization of environmental concerns.

The conference welcomes environmental academics, practitioners, and interested colleagues regardless of discipline or country. Participants may organize sessions (please ask for “Panel Organizer Guidelines”), present papers, participate in poster sessions, chair sessions, discuss papers, participate in roundtable discussions, or simply observe. The conference also welcomes papers and posters submitted by both graduate and undergraduate students, as well as papers and posters submitted in association with chapters of Kappa Alpha Omicron (advisors, please contact for details).

To facilitate communication, authors should make an effort to write papers and design posters that can be understood by an audience outside their disciplines. All papers submitted for publication consideration in Interdisciplinary Environmental Review must pass peer review from both within and outside the primary discipline of the author(s). The program consists of:

  • Small concurrent seminar-type sessions with chairperson, presenters, and a discussant assigned to comment on and integrate the ideas of the presentations
  • A poster session with time for discussion with the authors
  • Round-table thematic discussions with moderator
  • Workshops and panels
  • Invited keynote speakers
  • Welcome reception
  • Conference banquet luncheon

There will be an opening reception for all on Thursday evening, June 21. Registration and conference materials will be available at the Reception and starting at 8:00 AM throughout the conference. Students are welcome at all events.

We welcome research that crosses the boundaries of traditional disciplines to frame environmental problems, propose working models, or address field, community, or academic issues in any area of environmental and sustainability research.


Please, submit your abstract (of no more than 300 words) by May 15, 2018. All submitted abstracts will be evaluated for presentation and publication in the Book of Abstracts which will be available at the Conference.

  • You may submit abstracts for no more than 2 presentations (paper or poster);
  • For co-authorships please include names, affiliations, and addresses of all authors and indicate who will serve as presenter
  • Abstracts are required for all Posters
  • Abstracts accepted only on a space available basis after May 15, 2018

Publication Opportunity

To have your papers considered for publication in the sponsored the IEA journal titled Interdisciplinary Environmental Review (IER), please submit your paper, at any time, as prescribed by the publisher here or at this URL: < >. Papers submitted for review by the IER must not have been published, accepted, or submitted for publication elsewhere. All papers will be evaluated using an  interdisciplinary double-blind peer and review process. Paper submission is optional.

More Information:


CFP: International Association for the Study of Environment, Space, and Place

14th Annual Conference

The International Association for the Study of Environment, Space, and Place

University of Mary Washington

April 27-29, 2018

Conference Theme:

Wild Places, Natural Spaces

We live in a world increasingly populated and altered by human beings.  Along with the physical transformations have come fundamental changes in how we conceptualize our relationship with the world around us.  Where once wild places represented darkness, danger, and temptation, they now conjure images of personal challenge (“conquering” the Appalachian trail or Mount Rainier), individual spiritual renewal, or hope against the degradation of rampant consumerism, inequality, or political rot.  Nature—and its supposed pure form, wilderness—is both seen as the opposite of all things human and yet our true home.  These changing and often inconsistent metaphors and models guide us in every area of our lives—the social, economic, aesthetic, philosophic, religious, and scientific.  But questions arise at every turn:  Are we part of nature or distinct?  Do our “real” selves reside in “tamed” or “wild” spaces, and what do these mean?  Does our presence in a place, or the effects of our actions on a place, make it irreparably or happily humanized?  What responsibilities do we have to develop coherent and ethically-viable constructions of the human/nature nexus?  How, historically, have the ideas of wilderness, nature, and society co-evolved?  How have they been represented?  And, importantly, what does it mean to speak about the wild and the natural in a multicultural world in which we assign different meanings to these concepts?

This interdisciplinary conference will explore these and related questions.  We invite papers from any discipline that deal with the theme of this conference. Potential topics include:


·         Wilderness

·         Tame and wild

·         Nature and culture

·         Technology and society

·         Built, or rebuilt, natural place

·         Overpopulation and population ethics

·         Sustainability

·         Social construction of nature and culture

·         Phenomenology of wild and tame

·         Urban environmental ethics

·         Anthropological accounts of the wild

·         The mapping of human and nonhuman place

·         Historic conceptualizations of the natural

·         Aesthetic treatment of wildness

·         Ethics of preservation

·         Activism in defense of the natural

·         National parks as repositories of natural processes

Send proposals (please limit to 400 words) to Troy Paddock by Friday, February 9, 2018.  Each presentation will be capped at 20 minutes with an additional 10 minutes of Q&A time.  Proposals for 3-person panels are also welcome (each full session will be 90 minutes).  

CFP: The Northwestern University Society for the Theory of Ethics and Politics

Call for Papers
The Northwestern University Society for the Theory of Ethics and Politics (NUSTEP) will be holding its 12th annual conference at Northwestern University on March 8–March 10, 2018. The conference will feature keynote addresses by Niko Kolodny (Berkeley) and Sharon Street (NYU). We are now accepting paper submissions.
SUBMISSION GUIDELINES: We welcome submissions from faculty and graduate students, as some sessions will be reserved for student presentations. Please submit an essay of approximately 4000 words. Essay topics in all areas of ethical theory and political philosophy will be considered, although some priority will be given to essays that take up themes from the work of Niko Kolodny and Sharon Street: constructivism, evolution and morality, democracy, subordination, domination, epistemic and practical reasons, friendship and love, liberalism, metaethics, political authority, and rationality. Essays should be prepared for blind review in word, rtf, or pdf format. 

Graduate submissions
 should be sent by e-mail to
Faculty submissions should be sent by e-mail to

The deadline for submissions is December 15, 2017
. Notices of acceptance will be sent by January 31, 2018. For more information, please contact Kyla Ebels-Duggan at the e-mail address above or visit our website:

Call For Papers-Grappling with the Futures: Insights from Philosophy, History, and Science, Technology and Society

Sunday April 29 – Monday 30, 2018


A Symposium Hosted in Boston by

Harvard University (Department of the History of Science) 

Boston University (Department of Philosophy)

Co-Sponsored by:



Yashar Saghai (Johns Hopkins University and The Millennium Project)

Roberto Poli (University of Trento)

Peter Galison (Harvard University)

Russell Powell (Boston University)


Futures studies, which emerged as a new field after WWII, offer a variety of methods for predicting, forecasting, anticipating, controlling, imagining, and shaping multiple futures. Those methods include trend extrapolation, predictive modeling, scenario-planning, Delphi, and Wild Cards, to name a few. The goal of this symposium is to bring together philosophers, historians, and science, technology and society (STS) scholars who are deeply engaged with the exploration of the futures. We will begin an interdisciplinary dialogue that interrogates the goals, concepts, and methods of futures studies and probes informal futures-oriented thinking that is ubiquitous in social thought and practice. 


From the 1950s on, American and European philosophers took part in the creation of futures studies. In the US, they relied on their background in logic, philosophy of science, and epistemology; in Europe, they mainly mobilized political and social philosophy, philosophy of action, ontology, and axiology. However, from the ‘80s to the end of the ‘90s, philosophers were less involved with the field.  What are new philosophical issues, theories, concepts, and forms of engagement with futures studies? How are anticipation, forecast, and foresight related? What is the meaning and the value of the distinction between possible, probable, plausible, and desirable/undesirable futures? How can political and social philosophy, as well as ethics, fairly evaluate the normative dimensions of futures studies and contribute to making futures studies normatively more compelling in collaboration with practitioners? At a time when non-ideal theories of justice have gained momentum, what role should aspirational ideals, social hopes, and utopias play in normative conceptions of desirable futures? What role should risk, uncertainty, worst-case scenarios, and dystopias play in our anticipatory attitudes towards undesirable futures and our policy decisions? What theoretical frameworks can philosophers mobilize to investigate informal futures-oriented thinking?


Historians have engaged with futures studies in several manners. Early on, Reinhart Koselleck elaborated the study of “futures past.” How do contemporary historians reconstruct perceived future options from the perspective of past agents in specific contexts (e.g., Cold War; medicine), and embed their inquiry into broader historiographic, methodological, and social concerns? What have historians gleaned from the investigation of national and transnational trajectories of futures studies? What is the epistemic value and academic status of counterfactuals in historical research as compared to futures studies? How do questions about regimes of historicity and the futures mesh with new approaches to historical explanations and theories of history?


Finally, STS studies have for decades investigated the futures and stressed the performative dimension of assertions about the future in public policy and R&D contexts. How does STS construe the imaginaries at work in futures studies, popular culture, politics, and social movements? What is the potential contribution of the growing field of visual STS to understanding the exploration of the futures as a material, social, and institutional practice? What are new issues and theories in the sociology of expectations? Why is professionalization sometimes embraced and sometimes resisted within futures studies? How do technologies of futures studies change the governmentality of the futures in different contexts, such as energy policy, healthcare, food systems, science and technology, predictive policing, and environmental regulations?


These are some of the questions that will be discussed at the symposium through discipline-specific and interdisciplinary sessions. Speakers will have 20 minutes to present their original research.

Abstracts from all relevant fields are encouraged. 



· Friday November 3: Submission of abstracts

· Friday November 24: Notification of decision on abstracts to authors

· Friday December 8: Final symposium schedule

· Monday December 11: Registration begins 

· Friday March 30, 2018: Full draft of papers to be shared with respondents


Submissions should be prepared in Word format and contain the following information:

· Title

· Name

· Affiliation

· Abstract (250 words)

Upon reception, abstracts will be anonymized for blind review and selection. 

Registration to the symposium is required and free of charge. Regretfully, we cannot offer any travel grant.


Please email abstracts and queries to Yashar Saghai at

Updates on the symposium will be available on our Website: