VAP – Environmental Studies at Denison University

Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies: Denison University

The Denison University Environmental Studies Program invites applications for a two-year, full time, non-tenure track position at the Visiting Assistant Professor level, beginning August 2020. PhD in an appropriate discipline by August 2020 is required. We seek a colleague with a strong academic background in environmental studies, a capacity for working across disciplinary boundaries, a commitment to liberal arts education, and a specialty that complements the scholarly interests and teaching expertise of our current

program faculty. We are particularly interested in scholars who work in the environmental humanities and/or whose research focus is outside of the United States, but candidates working in all areas of specialty are welcome to apply. The successful candidate will be an outstanding teacher/scholar capable of teaching all courses in the core of our curriculum: ENVS 100 Integrated Environmental Studies; ENVS 200 Environmental Analysis; ENVS 301 Environmental Practicum; and ENVS 401 Environmental Senior Project (see course descriptions at http://denison.edu/academics/environmental-studies).

The successful candidate will also teach advanced courses reflecting both the candidate’s expertise and the needs of the program. Previous teaching experience and an active research agenda are preferred. The teaching load for this position is 6 courses per year. 

Denison University is an increasingly diverse, highly selective, residential liberal arts college enrolling approximately 2100 students from across the nation and around the world. It offers a competitive salary and a comprehensive benefits package. Denison is located in the village of Granville, 30 minutes from Columbus, Ohio, the state capital, which hosts a wide range of cultural and artistic opportunities. Granville also offers an excellent public school system and easy access to outdoor activities. Our college is committed to attracting and supporting an academically and culturally diverse faculty. To achieve our mission as a liberal arts college, we continually strive to foster a diverse campus community, which recognizes the value of all persons regardless of religion, race, ethnicity, gender, color gender identity and or expression, sexual orientation, family configuration, disability, socioeconomic status, religion, national origin, age or military status. For additional information and resources about diversity at Denison please see our Diversity Guide at http://denison.edu/forms/diversity-guide.

Denison University is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer.

Candidates should visit https://employment.denison.edu and submit: a cover letter; curriculum vitae; statement of teaching philosophy; undergraduate and graduate transcripts (may be unofficial); and the name, phone and email contact information of three academic references, who the University will contact to submit letters of recommendation. In your cover letter, please address your teaching experience and scholarly interests within the context of environmental studies, your capacity for interdisciplinary teaching and scholarship, and your potential to foster and support diverse perspectives among students, faculty, and the campus community. Candidates are encouraged to submit sample course evaluations from previous teaching experience.

Completed application materials submitted by February 1, 2020 will receive full consideration. Review of application materials will continue until the position is filled.

UCBS: Open Level Faculty Position – Environmental Ethics

Open Level Faculty Position – Environmental Ethics

The Environmental Studies Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara invites applications for a tenured or tenure-track faculty position at the level of Assistant, Associate, or

Full Professor, with an anticipated start date of July 1, 2020. The Program is looking for individuals with particular emphasis in the area of Environmental Ethics.

The Program seeks candidates with backgrounds in philosophy or a related field in the social sciences or humanities. For this position, we define “ethics” broadly to include any of the three traditional areas of inquiry in this field —meta-, normative, or applied ethics. The Program is particularly interested in scholars who have both theoretical and applied interests, and whose work crosses disciplinary, methodological, cultural, or geographic boundaries. Possible focus areas include climate change, conservation, food and agriculture, risk and vulnerability, the role of science in society, decision-making, social inequality, law, and politics.

Established in 1970, the Environmental Studies Program at UC Santa Barbara is one of the oldest and largest programs of its kind, with more than 1,000 current majors and over 7,000 alumni. The program has a longstanding commitment to interdisciplinary research and teaching, and a

balance among the biophysical sciences, social sciences, humanities, and applied professions. UC Santa Barbara is a Hispanic Serving Institution, and more than 40 percent of our undergraduates are first-generation college students.

For more information, please see http://www.es.ucsb.edu/

Responsibilities of faculty members generally include a research program of the highest quality, teaching at undergraduate and/or graduate levels, recruitment, supervision, and mentorship of graduate students, and participation in university service and professional activities. At a minimum, all applicants must have completed all requirements for a PhD (or equivalent) except the dissertation at the time of application. A PhD in Environmental Ethics or a related field is

required by anticipated appointment start date. Additionally, Associate/Full rank candidates should have research experience in academia or industry after receipt of PhD. A demonstrated record of excellence in research, and a record of (or potential for) excellent teaching are desired. We are especially interested in candidates who show a potential for cross-campus collaboration, and who can contribute to the diversity of our university community. Successful candidates will have a record of collaborative research, and will be able to participate in an interdisciplinary

environment within the Environmental Studies Program and Division. The University is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching and service as appropriate to the position.

Applications should be submitted electronically, and must include:

  • Cover letter
  • Curriculum vitae
  • Statement of research
  • Statement of teaching
  • Two recent publications, draft manuscripts, or dissertation/book chapters
  • Applicants at the Assistant rank will need to arrange for 3 references to submit letters of

    recommendation on their behalf via UC Recruit

  • Applicants at the Associate/Full rank will need to submit the names and contact

information for 3 references.

Diversity, equity, and inclusion are core values at UC Santa Barbara. Our excellence can only be fully realized by faculty, students, and staff who share our commitment to these values. The Program strongly encourages all applicants to submit an optional Statement of Contributions to Diversity addressing past and/or potential contributions to diversity through research, teaching, and service.

Applications received by November 15, 2019 will be given priority consideration, but the position will remain open until filled.

To apply please visit https://recruit.ap.ucsb.edu/apply/JPF01567
The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

Colloquium to celebrate the 250th anniversary of Alexander von Humboldt

Thom Heyd, long-time member of ISEE and co-representative of ISEE in Canada, has organised a Colloquium to celebrate the 250th anniversary of Alexander von Humboldt. The aim of the event is to open a discussion on the importance of Humboldt’s integrative approach to science and the planet at this time when we try to confront the reality of the Anthropocene. It takes place on 13-14 September 2019 at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Further information may be found at https://www.uvic.ca/socialsciences/geography/assets/docs/von-humboldt-anthropocene.pdf.

 

Adapting Environmental Ethics to Rapid, Anthropogenic, and Global Ecological Change

Adapting Environmental Ethics to Rapid, Anthropogenic, and Global Ecological Change

H.J. Andrews Forest Research Station

Blue River, Oregon

JULY 10-13, 2019

Conference report by Emma Marris

This July, environmental ethicists from around the world gathered under 500-year-old Douglas-firs and hemlocks at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon to share their work. The 16th annual ISEE Summer Meeting featured several papers touching on environmental policy, environmental psychology, and the role of the philosopher in the ongoing climate and biodiversity crisis—a practical bent that perhaps reflects an increased sense of urgency and momentum in the world of environmental activism. In that vein, the meeting closed with a strategy session, led by Eugene Chislenko of Temple University, in which the assembled philosophers shared insights on how they could fold climate activism into their work. 

Over the course of three days, the group worked through 18 draft papers on topics ranging from bees as symbols of neoliberal environmental thought to the role of gene drives in conservation to legal strategies for holding climate emitters responsible for losses and damages resulting from their actions. The keynote address, by Katie McShane of Colorado State University, took up perhaps the most central of all environmental ethics questions: how are we to value the natural world? McShane argued for a value system that goes beyond welfarism—what is good for an entity—and embraces values derived from appreciative attitudes like “respect, awe, wonder, admiration, interest, attachment, and aesthetics.” She gave as an example the wonder she feels when contemplating a neutron star—the collapsed core of a giant sun—despite the fact that the unimaginably distant object can be of no practical benefit to her.

Between papers, conference-goers chatted over delicious meals cooked up by two chefs who noted that the group had the most vegans they had ever cooked for. The chefs rose to the challenge, and one vegan attendee remarked that he wasn’t used to having so many choices! One evening, conversation continued after dinner at a cheerfully crackling campfire. Two children notably polished off almost an entire bag of marshmallows, with just a little help from the philosophers gathered around the fire. 

Attendees were also treated to a personal tour of the experimental forest by the principal investigator, Micheal Nelson of Oregon State University, himself a philosopher, and Fred Swanson, a geologist and ecosystem scientist with the US Forest Service who has studied the forest for decades. Together, the two sketched out the research conducted at the site and the food web of an old-growth forest, highlighting the surprising role of nitrogen-fixing lichen, which make the nutrient available to the trees after they fall from the canopy and rot into the soil. As the philosophers listened, mosquitoes flitted among them, weaving them into the food web by sucking their blood. The circle was completed when the humans nibbled on the red huckleberries that thrive in the understory. 

Another highlight was a lecture by owl expert Tim Fox, an archaeologist for the U.S. Forest Service who studied spotted owls earlier in his career. Fox shared stories from his time in the field, owl calls, and his thoughts on the current strategy for protecting the spotted owl, which includes shooting barred owls that have been making their way from the east coast and out-competing the smaller endangered owl for territories. It is the kind of ethical puzzle that cried out for analysis by environmental ethicists—a case study just waiting under the trees for the philosophers to take a crack at. 

The ethicists left the meeting with new knowledge, new ideas, new professional relationships, new mosquito bites, and the pleasant odor of campfire-smoke woven into their clothes.

APA Eastern ISEE Program

International Society for Environmental Ethics

2019 Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association

January 7-10, 2019, New York NY

 

Session 1

January 8 (tentative)

Subject: Future Generations and Justice

Chair: TBD

 

Speaker: Alex Richardson (University of Tennessee, Knoxville)

Title: Capability Deprivation as Intergenerational Harm

 

Speaker: Tom Randall (University of Western Ontario)

Title: Care Ethics, Climate Change, and Future Generations

 

Speaker: Rafael Ziegler (Universität Greifswald)

Title: Double Sufficientarianism

 

Session 2

January 8 (tentative)

Subject: Emissions, Energy, and Worldviews of the Anthropocene

Chair: TBD

 

Speaker: Eamon Aloyo (Leiden University)

Title: Individual Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Harm, and Coercion

 

Speaker: Mark Cooper (Murdoch University)

Title: Negentropism: An Ecological Theory of Value Based on Energy

 

Speaker: Agostino Cera (University of Basilicata)

Title: The Limit of Responsibility: The Ethical Paradox of the Anthropocene

 

Speaker: Ben-Willie Kwaku Golo (University of Ghana)

Title: African Indigenous Ecological Knowledge & the Moral Standing of the Earth

FINAL CALL – ISEE at the Pacific APA, 2015

Submissions are invited for the International Society for Environmental Ethics (ISEE) sessions at the 2015 Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association (APA).  The upcoming meeting will be held in the beautiful and diverse city of Vancouver, Canada from Wednesday, April 1 to Sunday, April 5th at the Westin Bayshore Hotel. Continue reading