APA Eastern ISEE Program

International Society for Environmental Ethics

2019 Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association

January 7-10, 2019, New York NY

 

Session 1

January 8 (tentative)

Subject: Future Generations and Justice

Chair: TBD

 

Speaker: Alex Richardson (University of Tennessee, Knoxville)

Title: Capability Deprivation as Intergenerational Harm

 

Speaker: Tom Randall (University of Western Ontario)

Title: Care Ethics, Climate Change, and Future Generations

 

Speaker: Rafael Ziegler (Universität Greifswald)

Title: Double Sufficientarianism

 

Session 2

January 8 (tentative)

Subject: Emissions, Energy, and Worldviews of the Anthropocene

Chair: TBD

 

Speaker: Eamon Aloyo (Leiden University)

Title: Individual Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Harm, and Coercion

 

Speaker: Mark Cooper (Murdoch University)

Title: Negentropism: An Ecological Theory of Value Based on Energy

 

Speaker: Agostino Cera (University of Basilicata)

Title: The Limit of Responsibility: The Ethical Paradox of the Anthropocene

 

Speaker: Ben-Willie Kwaku Golo (University of Ghana)

Title: African Indigenous Ecological Knowledge & the Moral Standing of the Earth

FINAL CALL – ISEE at the Pacific APA, 2015

Submissions are invited for the International Society for Environmental Ethics (ISEE) sessions at the 2015 Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association (APA).  The upcoming meeting will be held in the beautiful and diverse city of Vancouver, Canada from Wednesday, April 1 to Sunday, April 5th at the Westin Bayshore Hotel. Continue reading

Welcome (?) to the Anthropocene

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
cordially invites you to the 11th Meeting on Environmental Philosophy
Allenspark, Colorado, USA, June 17-20, 2014

Registration deadline: June 10th, 2014

This year’s theme is the the moral significance of the Anthropocene—the ethics of geoengineering, questions about wildness and wilderness, the morality of species extinctions, and related topics. Continue reading

A Philosopher at the IPCC

John BroomeBy John Broome
email: john.broome@philosophy.ox.ac.uk 
White's Professor of Moral Philosophy and
Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Oxford

John is a British ethicist and economist. 
His most recent book is Climate Matters: 
Ethics in a Warming World

Published May 20, 2014

Climate change is a moral problem. Each of us causes the emission of greenhouse gas, which spreads around the Earth. Some of it stays in the atmosphere for centuries. It causes harm to people who live far away and to members of future generations. Moreover, the harm we cause, taken together, is very great. As a result of climate change, people are losing their homes to storms and floods, they are losing their livelihoods as their farmland dries up, and they are losing even their lives as tropical diseases climb higher in the mountains of Africa. We should not cause harms like these to other people in order to make life better for ourselves.

It is chiefly for moral reasons that we inhabitants of rich countries should reduce our emissions. Doing so will benefit us—particularly the young among us—to an extent, but most of the benefit will come to the world’s poor and to future generations. Our main reason for working to limit climate change is our moral duty towards those people.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recognizes that climate change is a moral problem or, to use its cautious language, it raises ethical issues. The authors of the IPCC’s recent Fifth Assessment Report therefore included two moral philosophers. I am one of them. I recently returned from the Approval Session of IPCC’s Working Group 3 in Berlin. This was one of the most extraordinary experiences of my academic life.

VIDEOCASTS – Archival Footage from the First Earth Day, April 1970

First Earth Day: April 22, 1970, NBC News

A look at different demonstrations and celebrations of the first Earth Day, April 22, 1970 from around the country.  The clip ends with a quote from Jay Murray Mitchell of the American Geophysical Union who warned (in 1970) of increasing levels of pollution which could lead to a greenhouse effect within the next 200 years and extensive global flooding caused by the melting of the Arctic Ice cap. Continue reading

When Did Earth Day Become So Irrelevant?

Today is Earth Day, April 22, 2014. Like most Earth Days these days, a few grey-haired environmentalists may take note of the event, celebrities will tweet meaningless platitudes like Daryl Hannah’s exhortation that we should all “love your mother,” and college students will have celebrations at their campuses emphasizing individual consumer choice and the pursuit of sustainability through better technology. When did Earth Day become so irrelevant? Continue reading