CFP: Holmes Rolston III Early Career Essay Prize in Environmental Philosophy

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2021 Call for Papers

Holmes Rolston III Early Career Essay Prize in Environmental Philosophy

The International Association for Environmental Ethics is issuing an essay prize open to its members who are scholars in an early stage of their career.

The prize is named in honor of Professor Holmes Rolston III, for his pioneering work in the field of environmental philosophy. Papers are invited on all aspects of environmental philosophy or environmental affairs (with a strong theoretical component).

A prize of $500 will be awarded to the winning essay. All submitted papers that qualify (see conditions) will be reviewed by an Essay Prize Committee of ISEE Officers in consultation with the Editorial Board of Environmental Ethics. The winning essay will be published in the journal Environmental Ethics.

Scholars who have earned their doctorate no more than five years prior to submission are invited to submit an essay. Submissions must be accompanied by a one-page CV to provide evidence of early career status. Only ISEE members are eligible for ISEE awards and prizes.

The word limit is 60,000 characters (including spaces), including notes and references. An abstract of 100-150 words should also be included. Essays must be prepared for blind review.

The essay should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere, and should not be submitted to any other journal until the outcome of the competition is announced.

Email submission to ISEE President Allen Thompson at <allen.thompson@oregonstate.edu> The closing date for submissions is June 1st, 2021.

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: 2021 Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics

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International Society for Environmental Ethics

2021 Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

To help build a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive field of environmental ethics, the

International Society for Environmental Ethics seeks to highlight intersectional scholarship in

environmental philosophy. To this end, we established an award in recognition Dr. Victoria Davion, who made cutting-edge contributions to interdisciplinary work in feminist and environmental ethics and was the founding editor of the journal, Ethics & the Environment. At the 2020 Annual Meeting of the Society, Dr. Chris Cuomo delivered a keynote address and was the inaugural recipient of the award.

With this call, the Society seeks nominations for the 2021 Victorian Davion Award for Intersectionality in Environmental Ethics. The award honors scholars engaged in intersectional work that describes, considers, or responds to overlapping forms of exclusion, discrimination, or injustice – such as the interplay of race, class, and gender in environmental injustice, or the relationship between colonialism and climate inequities.  Eligible candidates will be those whose work may be characterized, for example, as examining relations between environmental philosophy and feminist or gender studies, critical race theory, Indigenous studies, or disability studies. We aim to recognize work in research, teaching, and service that extends the scope of environmental ethics to incorporate perspectives and methods that have been historically marginalized or excluded from environmental philosophy as a discipline, and that address questions of epistemic justice, such as the devaluation of certain forms of knowledge within academic environmental philosophy, barriers to and opportunities for developing more inclusive perspectives, and approaches to respectfully collaborating across perspectives and traditions. In general, we seek to honor and advance work that brings different threads of philosophy and environmental thought—within and beyond formal academic discourse—together.

The award is open to individuals at all to stages of their career; however, candidates should demonstrate a sustained commitment to intersectional scholarship, or more broadly, to diversity, equity, and inclusion in the field of environmental ethics and beyond. Self-nominations are welcome.

Nominations should include:

  1. A letter of nomination, listing the name, affiliation (if any), and contact information of both the nominee and nominator. The letter should explain how and why the nominee qualifies for the award.
  2. The nominee’s curriculum vitae or professional resume.

Nominations may also include:

  • Descriptions, representative samples, or links to relevant work.
  • Additional letters of endorsement for the nomination, no more than two.

Please assemble the nominating materials into one PDF file. Nominations are due by March 15, 2021. They will be evaluated by ISEE Officers and members of the ISEE Nominating Committee.

Send nominations to ISEE President Allen Thompson: allen.thompson@oregonstate.edu

Announcement of the winner and finalists will be made at the 2021 Annual ISEE Meeting in June 2021.


CFP: Philosophy in the Wild

Call for Abstracts

Philosophy in the Wild invites abstract submissions for presentations at our inaugural workshop, the theme of which is environmental philosophy, very broadly construed.* This event is an outdoor, technology-free event.

From July 16th to 18th, 2021, participants will camp at Poe Paddy State Park in central Pennsylvania. Activities will include (though will not be limited to) keynote presentations, participant presentations/discussions, and hiking (optional). No prior camping experience is necessary; Philosophy in the Wild can work with participants to help arrange gear rentals.

This event is wheelchair accessible, although the campsite grounds include gravel. 

The event will follow the relevant local directives regarding Covid-19, and plans will be adjusted as needed. 

Please contact philosophywild@gmail.com with any inquiries.

*Environmental philosophy includes, but is not exhausted by, the following themes:

  • Environmental ethics; environmental aesthetics
  • Environmental political philosophy; environmental justice
  • Environment and capitalism
  • Postdevelopment and postcolonial theories
  • Philosophy of nature and metaphysics
  • Environment and social identities, including disability, indigeneity, race, queer ecologies, and ecofeminism
  • Social ecology and ecoanarchism
  • Climate change; sustainability; future generations
  • Urban ecology 
  • Environment and technology
  • Environment and religion
  • Animal ethics and critical animal studies
  • Environment and human flourishing

Abstracts should be approximately 500 words. Please submit your abstract in .pdf format, prepared for anonymous review, to philosophywild@gmail.com. In the body of the email, please include your name, university affiliation, and paper title. Papers should be suitable for a 25-minute presentation and a 25-minute Q&A session. Submissions from members of underrepresented groups in philosophy are especially encouraged.

Submission deadline: February 1, 2021

Decisions announced: April 1, 2021

Date of Workshop: July 16-18, 2021

Keynote Speakers:

Brendan Cline (CSU Channel Islands)

Karen Kovaka (Virginia Tech)

Organized by: Philosophy in the Wild; https://agoffz.wixsite.com/phil-in-the-wild

Contactphilosophywild@gmail.comhttp://bit.ly/2Rv2cRa 

ISEE Sessions at APA Eastern

For those attending the Eastern Division virtual meeting of the APA, ISEE Group Sessions will be as follows:

Thursday, Jan. 14, 11 am-12:50 pm (U.S. Eastern Time)

12L. International Society for Environmental Ethics

Topic: Animals and the Environment: Rights, Responsibilities, and Reverence

Chair: Marion Hourdequin (Colorado College)

Speakers:

  • Keith Hyams (Warwick University) Winner, Andrew Light Award for Public Philosophy
  • Kimberly Dill (Santa Clara University) “A Call to Environmental Reverence”
  • Corey Katz (Georgian Court University) “Scanlon’s Contractualism and Animal Ethics”
  • Connor Kianpour (Georgia State University) “Protections without Rights”

Friday, Jan. 15, 11 am-12:50 pm (U.S. Eastern Time)

16K. International Society for Environmental Ethics

Topic: Perspectives on Anthropocentrism, Non-Anthropocentrism, Agency, and Value

Chair: Marion Hourdequin (Colorado College)

Speakers:

  • Suvielise Nurmi (University of Helsinki) “Environmental Responsibilities as Responsibilities for Relational Moral Agency”
  • Espen Dyrnes Stabell (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) “Why Environmental Philosophers Should Be Buck-Passers about Value”
  • Akinpelu Oyekunle (Adekunle Ajasin University) “On the Idea of an African Environmental Philosophy: Arguments for Complementary Environmental Ethics”

In addition, after the Thursday session, ISEE will hold an informal social gathering on Spatial Chat from 1-2 pm Eastern time (over the meeting’s “lunch break” for those who happen to be on Eastern time!), to enable opportunities for further conversation.  More information will be sent out next week.

St. Mary’s University

AOS:Philosophy of law, political philosophy, or social philosophy broadly construed (so as to include, e.g., feminist theory or critical race theory).

AOC:

Biomedical Ethics
Environmental Philosophy
Feminist Philosophy

The Saint Mary’s University Department of Philosophy invites applications for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor, to begin July 1, 2021. The successful candidate will have a PhD in philosophy (in hand or with a defense date set), and should show potential for excellence in research and teaching.

AOS: Philosophy of law, political philosophy, or social philosophy broadly construed (so as to include, e.g., feminist theory or critical race theory).

AOC: Open, but the department has teaching needs in critical thinking and/or legal reasoning, bioethics, environmental ethics, and feminist philosophy.

The department is currently in the process of developing a Law and Philosophy major to complement our existing major, honours, minor, and masters programs in philosophy. The successful candidate will be expected to contribute to the development of the Law and Philosophy major and to teach courses that strengthen it.

The standard teaching load is five courses per year, with a one-course release in the first two years of the appointment.

At Saint Mary’s University equity and diversity are integral to excellence and enrich our community. As an institution committed to fostering an environment of inclusion and respect, we welcome applications from women, Indigenous peoples, racialized persons/visible minorities, persons with disabilities and others who might contribute to the growth and enrichment of our community.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, preference will be given to Canadian citizens and permanent residents. If you require accommodations during the recruitment process, please contact Human Resources at hr@smu.ca.

The Philosophy Department offers degree programs at the undergraduate and master’s levels, Saint Mary’s is a public, secular university with over 7,000 students, offering a variety of undergraduate and graduate degrees. Our university is committed to serving the local, regional, national and international communities, and integrating such activity as part of the learning environment for undergraduate and graduate students. Saint Mary’s is located in the historic port city of Halifax, Nova Scotia, a vibrant, urban community of over 430,000 people. Halifax is a major educational centre for Atlantic Canada and is home to five universities. It is conveniently located near to recreational areas and to other major urban centres in Canada and the Northeastern United States.

To apply for the position, send (as a single PDF) a cover letter, CV, evidence of teaching effectiveness, and a writing sample to philosophy.search2021@smu.ca. Additionally, arrange to have at least three letters of reference sent to philosophy.search2021@smu.ca. The deadline for applications is January 8, 2021. Any questions about the application can be addressed to the search committee chair, Scott Edgar (scott.edgar@smu.ca)

to apply: philosophy.search2021@smu.ca

University of Pennsylvania: Global Innovation Program Postdoctoral Fellowships 2021-2022


Description

The Global Innovation Program at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perry World House invites applications for its postdoctoral fellowship program during the 2021-2022 academic year. The Global Innovation Program is the research arm of Perry World House, the University of Pennsylvania’s hub for global engagement and interdisciplinary international policy research. Perry World House connects Penn to the international policy world through research, student engagement, and public programming, bringing the university’s intellectual resources to bear on the urgent global challenges of the 21st century.

We hope to bring several postdoctoral fellows to campus for the 2021-2022 academic year. We are seeking excellent scholars who study global affairs and have interests in interdisciplinary outreach and policy relevance. We are particularly interested in applicants in the following areas:

The Future of the Global Order: Power, Technology, and Governance

Global Shifts: Urbanization, Migration, and Demography

The Future of the Global Order

Changes in global economic, military, and technological circumstances are evident in growing concerns around the world about the future of arms control, multilateral economic institutions, technological decoupling, the future of the Islamic State, and more. The post-Cold War global order may be at a tipping point. In addition, systemic trends, such as globalization and climate change, mean that the challenges of today and tomorrow will be global – and require global responses. The role of automated trading algorithms in the 2010 “Flash Crash” in the United States, combined with the specter of drone warfare around the world due and the proliferation of military robotics, highlight how the intersection of technologies, such as cyber and robotics, presents enormous challenges for global business and diplomatic norms. In a time of change, academic research has the potential to shed significant light on these issues and highlight new and important approaches for the global policy community.

In this theme area, Perry World House will focus in part, but not exclusively, on four areas: the impacts of emerging technologies for global politics, shifting global power balances and how they influence both state and non-state actors, the evolution of international legal regimes, and the ability of the international community to sustain effective governing institutions in times of change. We particularly hope to have a postdoctoral fellow as part of our new project on emerging technologies and global politics.

Global Shifts

Crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change-induced extreme weather events, as well as growing urbanization, migration, and demographic changes, are radically transforming the human environment and creating new risks to well-being. New and changing migration patterns, whether propelled by armed conflicts, instability due to environmental changes, or economic hardships have profound consequences for people on the move and for those left behind. Similarly, the true risks of climate change are a function not just of hazards such as rising sea levels, fires, and tropical cyclones, but the physical location of people and the level of community and government support in place. 

Explaining these complex societal changes, and the policy responses necessary to address them, requires a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary approach. Perry World House’s Global Shifts program aims to develop an analytical understanding of these problems and suggest new policy approaches to them. It draws on the University’s expertise in urban studies, sociology, demography, law, philosophy, health sciences, environmental sciences, and political science to do so. We invite postdoctoral fellows working within any of these sub-thematic areas, and especially encourage scholars working at the intersection or across multiple of them—such as climate change’s effects on migration patterns or the impact of city policymaking on migration and refugees.

Qualifications

There are no mandatory teaching responsibilities. Postdoctoral fellows in the Global Innovation Program will pursue their own research as well as participate in the intellectual life of Perry World House. Postdoctoral fellows will be expected to give a presentation during the academic year in the Perry World House Seminar Series, publish policy relevant scholarship related to Perry World House themes, and attend regularly scheduled seminars. They will also be expected to spend up to 10% of their time contributing to the intellectual environment at Perry World House, including working with Perry World House’s Undergraduate Student Fellows, as well as designing and planning engagements in relevant theme areas. Perry World House will provide mentorship, professional guidance, and introduce each postdoctoral fellow to related faculty and leaders of centers and institutes at the University of Pennsylvania.

Applications are welcome from scholars who have received their Ph.D. or equivalent degrees (including a J.D. in the case of applicants focused on international legal regimes) since June 2019, or who expect to complete their degree by June 2021. Applications will be reviewed starting Monday, January 4, 2021. To receive full consideration, applications and letters of recommendation should be received by that date. 

Upon provision of and contingent upon proof of conferral of the Ph.D. degree, all postdoctoral fellow positions pay a stipend of $54,000 plus relevant fees and health insurance. The position also provides $2,000 in research support.

Application Instructions

To apply, please go to: http://apply.interfolio.com/80778. Applicants will be asked to complete a short form as well as upload a cover letter, CV/resume, one-page research statement, writing sample, and unofficial Ph.D. transcript (only required for current graduate students). We will also ask for the name and email address of two letter writers who can submit a letter of recommendation.

If you have questions, please email worldhouse@pwh.upenn.edu