St. Mary’s University

AOS:Philosophy of law, political philosophy, or social philosophy broadly construed (so as to include, e.g., feminist theory or critical race theory).

AOC:

Biomedical Ethics
Environmental Philosophy
Feminist Philosophy

The Saint Mary’s University Department of Philosophy invites applications for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor, to begin July 1, 2021. The successful candidate will have a PhD in philosophy (in hand or with a defense date set), and should show potential for excellence in research and teaching.

AOS: Philosophy of law, political philosophy, or social philosophy broadly construed (so as to include, e.g., feminist theory or critical race theory).

AOC: Open, but the department has teaching needs in critical thinking and/or legal reasoning, bioethics, environmental ethics, and feminist philosophy.

The department is currently in the process of developing a Law and Philosophy major to complement our existing major, honours, minor, and masters programs in philosophy. The successful candidate will be expected to contribute to the development of the Law and Philosophy major and to teach courses that strengthen it.

The standard teaching load is five courses per year, with a one-course release in the first two years of the appointment.

At Saint Mary’s University equity and diversity are integral to excellence and enrich our community. As an institution committed to fostering an environment of inclusion and respect, we welcome applications from women, Indigenous peoples, racialized persons/visible minorities, persons with disabilities and others who might contribute to the growth and enrichment of our community.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, preference will be given to Canadian citizens and permanent residents. If you require accommodations during the recruitment process, please contact Human Resources at hr@smu.ca.

The Philosophy Department offers degree programs at the undergraduate and master’s levels, Saint Mary’s is a public, secular university with over 7,000 students, offering a variety of undergraduate and graduate degrees. Our university is committed to serving the local, regional, national and international communities, and integrating such activity as part of the learning environment for undergraduate and graduate students. Saint Mary’s is located in the historic port city of Halifax, Nova Scotia, a vibrant, urban community of over 430,000 people. Halifax is a major educational centre for Atlantic Canada and is home to five universities. It is conveniently located near to recreational areas and to other major urban centres in Canada and the Northeastern United States.

To apply for the position, send (as a single PDF) a cover letter, CV, evidence of teaching effectiveness, and a writing sample to philosophy.search2021@smu.ca. Additionally, arrange to have at least three letters of reference sent to philosophy.search2021@smu.ca. The deadline for applications is January 8, 2021. Any questions about the application can be addressed to the search committee chair, Scott Edgar (scott.edgar@smu.ca)

to apply: philosophy.search2021@smu.ca

University of Pennsylvania: Global Innovation Program Postdoctoral Fellowships 2021-2022


Description

The Global Innovation Program at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perry World House invites applications for its postdoctoral fellowship program during the 2021-2022 academic year. The Global Innovation Program is the research arm of Perry World House, the University of Pennsylvania’s hub for global engagement and interdisciplinary international policy research. Perry World House connects Penn to the international policy world through research, student engagement, and public programming, bringing the university’s intellectual resources to bear on the urgent global challenges of the 21st century.

We hope to bring several postdoctoral fellows to campus for the 2021-2022 academic year. We are seeking excellent scholars who study global affairs and have interests in interdisciplinary outreach and policy relevance. We are particularly interested in applicants in the following areas:

The Future of the Global Order: Power, Technology, and Governance

Global Shifts: Urbanization, Migration, and Demography

The Future of the Global Order

Changes in global economic, military, and technological circumstances are evident in growing concerns around the world about the future of arms control, multilateral economic institutions, technological decoupling, the future of the Islamic State, and more. The post-Cold War global order may be at a tipping point. In addition, systemic trends, such as globalization and climate change, mean that the challenges of today and tomorrow will be global – and require global responses. The role of automated trading algorithms in the 2010 “Flash Crash” in the United States, combined with the specter of drone warfare around the world due and the proliferation of military robotics, highlight how the intersection of technologies, such as cyber and robotics, presents enormous challenges for global business and diplomatic norms. In a time of change, academic research has the potential to shed significant light on these issues and highlight new and important approaches for the global policy community.

In this theme area, Perry World House will focus in part, but not exclusively, on four areas: the impacts of emerging technologies for global politics, shifting global power balances and how they influence both state and non-state actors, the evolution of international legal regimes, and the ability of the international community to sustain effective governing institutions in times of change. We particularly hope to have a postdoctoral fellow as part of our new project on emerging technologies and global politics.

Global Shifts

Crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change-induced extreme weather events, as well as growing urbanization, migration, and demographic changes, are radically transforming the human environment and creating new risks to well-being. New and changing migration patterns, whether propelled by armed conflicts, instability due to environmental changes, or economic hardships have profound consequences for people on the move and for those left behind. Similarly, the true risks of climate change are a function not just of hazards such as rising sea levels, fires, and tropical cyclones, but the physical location of people and the level of community and government support in place. 

Explaining these complex societal changes, and the policy responses necessary to address them, requires a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary approach. Perry World House’s Global Shifts program aims to develop an analytical understanding of these problems and suggest new policy approaches to them. It draws on the University’s expertise in urban studies, sociology, demography, law, philosophy, health sciences, environmental sciences, and political science to do so. We invite postdoctoral fellows working within any of these sub-thematic areas, and especially encourage scholars working at the intersection or across multiple of them—such as climate change’s effects on migration patterns or the impact of city policymaking on migration and refugees.

Qualifications

There are no mandatory teaching responsibilities. Postdoctoral fellows in the Global Innovation Program will pursue their own research as well as participate in the intellectual life of Perry World House. Postdoctoral fellows will be expected to give a presentation during the academic year in the Perry World House Seminar Series, publish policy relevant scholarship related to Perry World House themes, and attend regularly scheduled seminars. They will also be expected to spend up to 10% of their time contributing to the intellectual environment at Perry World House, including working with Perry World House’s Undergraduate Student Fellows, as well as designing and planning engagements in relevant theme areas. Perry World House will provide mentorship, professional guidance, and introduce each postdoctoral fellow to related faculty and leaders of centers and institutes at the University of Pennsylvania.

Applications are welcome from scholars who have received their Ph.D. or equivalent degrees (including a J.D. in the case of applicants focused on international legal regimes) since June 2019, or who expect to complete their degree by June 2021. Applications will be reviewed starting Monday, January 4, 2021. To receive full consideration, applications and letters of recommendation should be received by that date. 

Upon provision of and contingent upon proof of conferral of the Ph.D. degree, all postdoctoral fellow positions pay a stipend of $54,000 plus relevant fees and health insurance. The position also provides $2,000 in research support.

Application Instructions

To apply, please go to: http://apply.interfolio.com/80778. Applicants will be asked to complete a short form as well as upload a cover letter, CV/resume, one-page research statement, writing sample, and unofficial Ph.D. transcript (only required for current graduate students). We will also ask for the name and email address of two letter writers who can submit a letter of recommendation.

If you have questions, please email worldhouse@pwh.upenn.edu

Wake Forest: Mellon Teacher-Scholar Postdoctoral Fellow in Environmental Humanities

Job Description Summary

The Interdisciplinary Humanities Program at Wake Forest University invites applications for a non-tenure track, post-doctoral fellow position for a two-year term to begin July 1, 2021. Wake Forest has a strong institutional commitment to faculty diversity and excellence and is particularly interested in candidates who can bring to their research and teaching critical perspectives linked to the experiences of groups historically underrepresented in higher education.

Job Description

We are particularly interested in candidates who pursue broadly interdisciplinary, collaborative research on the environment across the arts and humanities and who take innovative approaches to possible areas of inquiry such as the environmental humanities; art, culture, and the environment; race, gender, sexuality and the environment; ethics, religion, philosophy and the environment;  environmental theory; environmental justice (especially at the local level); the Anthropocene; the nonhuman in the humanities; and epistemologies of environmental knowledge.

In the last three years, Wake Forest has been awarded two major grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support public humanities and the engaged Liberal Arts, and we seek candidates whose experiences and professional training are well-suited for working with local communities. Successful candidates will be expected to teach one course per semester in the Interdisciplinary Humanities Program and will collaborate with other Wake Forest University faculty and be a key participant in engaged humanities initiatives including local and national conferences, symposia, seminars, and forums. Candidates must have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. prior to the beginning of the appointment. As a University committed to the teacher-scholar ideal, Wake Forest expects excellent teaching at all levels, a sustained commitment to student and community engagement, and an active research agenda.  

Interested applicants should apply via the University’s career website at: https://hr.wfu.edu/careers/. The application should be submitted as ONE PDF file including: a letter of application, curriculum vitae, three-page statement of teaching and research philosophy, and one scholarly writing sample. Selected candidates will be asked to submit three confidential letters of recommendation after the initial review. If access to the internet is a difficulty, hard copies of the application can be submitted to Reynolda Hall 102, 1834 Wake Forest Rd, Winston-Salem, NC 27109. The application must be submitted by January 25th, 2021 for full consideration. Please direct requests for additional information to Professor José Luis Venegas, venegajl@wfu.edu. Information about the Interdisciplinary Humanities Program is available at https://humanities.wfu.edu/

Additional Job Description

Wake Forest University welcomes and encourages diversity and inclusivity, and seeks applicants with demonstrated success in working with diverse populations. Wake Forest University is an AA/EO employer and values an inclusive and diverse learning community and campus climate.

Teaching Webinar

Featured

The International Society for Environmental Ethics (ISEE) Mentoring Initiative is pleased to

 announce that our first webinar, Teaching Environmental Philosophy: Engaged

 and Inclusive Pedagogies, will be held on

Friday, November 6 from 4-5 pm PT/7-8 pm ET

The webinar, which features Chris Cuomo (University of Georgia), Rebeka Ferreira (Green River College), Ben Hole (Pacific University), and Clair Morrissey (Occidental College), will offer both new and experienced faculty the opportunity to explore engaged and inclusive teaching approaches in environmental philosophy.  The discussion will address stand-alone courses in environmental ethics and environmental philosophy, as well as ideas for integrating environmental dimensions into other courses, such as political philosophy, philosophy of science, aesthetics, and epistemology. The event will include a short presentation by each panelist, followed by Q&A and general discussion.  After the webinar, participants are invited to an informal social gathering in Spatial Chat. 

Both the webinar and gathering are free and open to all, but participants are asked to register in advance, here:  

https://coloradocollege.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMscuqhrzIrG9UzK9OLTPQewjmDatG4txaw

Meeting connection information will be provided by email upon registration. Any questions about the webinar can be directed to ISEE Mentoring Director Simona Capisani (scapisani@fas.harvard.edu) or ISEE Vice President Marion Hourdequin (mhourdequin@coloradocollege.edu).

International Society for Environmental Ethics: 17th Annual Meeting

17th Annual Meeting

International Society for Environmental Ethics

17th Annual Meeting

Oct. 16-18, 2020

(All times are PACIFIC)

Friday, Oct. 16th

Session One – What Do We See Ourselves Doing?

Chair: Alex Lee

      12:30 pm                              Opening Remarks – Allen Thompson, ISEE President

A. 12:45-1:30 pm   Avram Hiller, “‘Effective Environmentalism’: Review & Analysis”

                                                                        Comments: Ida Mullaart 

B. 1:30-2:15 pm                        Kimberly Dill, “A Call to Environmental Reverence”

                                                                        Comments: Chris Diehm

                  *2:30-3:30 pm        Spatial Chat – open for general discussion

                  *3:00-4:00 pm        ISEE Mentoring Initiative (all welcome)

                                                                        with Marion Hourdequin & Simona Capisani

Session Two – Keynote Address

Chair: Allen Thompson

Victoria Davion Award for Intersectionality

A. 4:30-6:00 pm                       Prof. Christine Cuomo (Title TBA)

B. 6:00-7:00 pm                        Spatial Chat –  for discussion / cocktail hour

Saturday, Oct. 17th

Session Three – Animals and Politics

Chair: Steve Vogel

8:50 am                    Opening Remarks – Allen Thompson, ISEE President

A. 9:00-9:45 am     Danny Weltman, “Animal Rescue: Civil Disobedience or Subrevolution?”

                                                                        Comments: Kristian Cantens

B. 9:45-10:30 am   Dennis Papadopoulos, ” Wild Animals’ Political Resistance”

                                                                        Comments: Jeremy Bendik-Keymer

                  Lunch Break (total time between sessions = 3 hours)

                  *10:30-11:30 am   Spatial Chat – open for general discussion

                  *12:00-1:00 pm                       Philosophers for Sustainability (all welcome)

                                                                                          with Eugene Chislenko & Rebecca Millsop

                                                                                          <philosophersforsustainability.com>

Session Four – Virtues and Radicalism

 Chair: Megs Gendreau

A. 1:30-2:15 pm                       Allison Fritz, “The Virtue of Shallow Environmentalism”

                                                                        Comments: Blake Francis

B. 2:15-3:00 pm                        Kristian Cantens, “Cultivating the Virtue of Self-Wildness”

                                                                        Comments: Christopher Rice

                  Half Hour Break

C. 3:30-4:15 pm                        Benjamin Hole, “Radical Virtue and Climate Action”

                                                                        Comments: Allison Fritz

D. 4:15-5:00 pm                       Sarah Warren, “Radical Empiricism, Radical Transformation”

                                                                        Comments: Espen Dyrnes Stabell

                  *5:00-6:30 pm        Spatial Chat – open for general discussion and socializing

Sunday, Oct. 18th

Session Five – Activism and Injustice

Chair: Marion Hourdequin

8:50 am                    Opening Remarks – Allen Thompson, ISEE President

A. 9:00 -9:45 am    Benjamin Howe, “Is it Right to Get Your Hands Dirty Fighting Climate Change?”

                                                                        Comments: Danny Weltman

B. 9:45-10:30 am   Blake Francis, “Climate Change Injustice”

                                                                        Comments: Ken Shockley

                  Lunch Break (total time between sessions = 3 hours)

                  *10:30 am-11:30 pm             Spatial Chat – open for general discussion

                  *11:30 am-1:15 pm                ISEE Business Meeting (all welcome)

                                                                                          Discussing matters of the Society

Session Six – How We Relate to the Wild

Chair: Robert Earl

A. 1:30-2:15 pm                       Ida Mullaart, “The Problem with Overpopulation”

                                                                        Comments: Benjamin Hole

B. 2:15-3:00 pm                        Chris Diehm, “Connection to Conservation”

                                                                        Comments: Avram Hiller

                  Half Hour Break

C. 3:30-4:15 pm                        Jeremy Bendik-Keymer, “The Other Species Capability & the Power of Wonder”

                                                                        Comments: Kimberly Dill

                  Closing Remarks: Allen Thompson, ISEE President

                  *4:40-6:00 pm        Spatial Chat – open for general discussion and goodbyes

CFP: International Society for Environmental Ethics

Featured

CALL FOR PAPERS

for the

International Society for Environmental Ethics

18th Annual Summer Meeting

Wednesday, 30th June

to Saturday 3rd July, 2021

at the

Archipelago Research Institute,

Centre for Environmental Research,

University of Turku,

Seili Island, Finland

on questions of

Space, Relations, and Populations

The 18th annual summer meeting of the International Society for Environmental Ethics will convene from Wednesday 30th June to Saturday 3rd July 2021, at Seili island, Finland, situated in Finnish Archipelago, in a historical 17th century leper-colony-turned-mental-asylum-turned-research-station.

This call for papers solicits 500-word proposals for presentations in any topic in environmental philosophy. However, special attention will be given to proposals for talks concerning issues related to the philosophical investigation of the intersection of environmental conditions of space, relations, and populations.

The planet is becoming more and more populated with human beings, which reduces the space available to other species and displaces them from their traditional habitats. At the same time, the Covid-19 pandemic seems to intersect with the way we occupy the space available – the expansion of human populations into previously wild places promises to only increase the threat of new pandemics. The corona virus is transmitted via shared social spaces, so we combat transmission by isolation and physical distancing. Are emergent and contested norms about “social distancing,” then, a new framework for coordinating collective action? Would some kind of “ecological distancing” be a logical next step? Questions about how we occupy space and our spatial relations to other beings, on an increasingly crowded planet, call for articulation and philosophical analysis.

We are exceeding the carrying capacity and limits of this planet in multiple and very tangible ways. There seems to be a need, then, for more space. How should we think about occupying the space available? Should we prioritize protection and restoration of habitats for the conservation of endangered species? Should the abundant human population be squeezed more tightly into urban spaces? Or should we learn to share the landscape with wild animals, domestic animals, ecosystems, and other humans? Won’t this call for control of human population growth? Is space exploration and colonization ultimately the key to solving our environmental problems on this planet, or is it just a technological fantasy?

Possible topics include questions relating to biodiversity loss, environmental protection and conservation, population ethics, anthropocentric land use, space exploration and colonization, and pandemics. We encourage imaginative thinking about how questions about spatial relations could shed new light upon questions in environmental ethics and philosophy.

To accommodate discussion on population and space, the meeting is hosted in a place which itself is an intriguing combination of secluded, restricted human population and abundant, verdant nature. The nature of Turku Archipelago offers exotic experiences of achingly lush yet ascetic Finnish summer, while the nearby city of Turku offers cultural experiences all the way from 13th century to this day. In addition to the beautiful natural environment, Seili island has a dark yet interesting history of isolation as a former leper colony. The venue itself, located in the island, is an old 17th century hospital building and its utility buildings, now used by the researchers of University of Turku. These historical buildings will accommodate us for the meeting. Off-session, we can enjoy the Nordic and Finnish nature, culture and history of the area. To reach the island and back to mainland, we will share a two-hour ferry through the picturesque archipelago, departing from Turku city center.

For more information about the venue, see https://www.visitseili.fi/en/accommodation/

Proposals prepared for blind review should be submitted via email to Mikko M. Puumala,

<mimapuu@utu.fi> no later than December 15th, 2020. Decisions will be announced by February 30th, 2021. Draft papers for pre-read by conference participants will be due May 31st, 2021.

Please note that while the meeting is planned to take place live, we are closely following the COVID-19 situation in Finland and other countries. We will put updates to ISEE website: https://enviroethics.org/